Immunology

Clinical Services

Seattle Children’s is one of the few places in the world where doctors are both carrying out cutting-edge research and providing treatment for primary immune deficiency disorders. We are the only referral center in the Northwest that specifically cares for pediatric and adult patients with PIDD. Our experts in immunology are internationally known for their work in identifying these serious disorders, as well as for their leadership in caring for children and adults with PIDD. Our laboratory offers the newest and most extensive testing to identify these disorders and their causes, and are at the forefront of research to find ways to treat and cure PIDD. We work closely with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) to coordinate care for our patients who need bone marrow transplants.

Meet the Immunology care team.

Conditions we treat

Seattle Children's Immunology team diagnoses and treats many primary immune deficiency disorders (PIDD), including among others:

  • Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)
    SCID is actually a group of inherited disorders that cause severe abnormalities of the immune system. These disorders lead to reduced or malfunctioning T- and B-lymphocytes, the specialized white blood cells made in the bone marrow to fight infection. When the immune system doesn’t function properly, it can be difficult or impossible for it to battle viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause infections.
  • Agammaglobulinemia
    Agammaglobulinemia is a disorder that blocks the development of a type of blood cell called B-lymphocytes. Mature B-lymphocytes release substances called antibodies that fight infection. People with agammaglobulinemia don’t have very many antibodies in their blood to fight off infections.
  • Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID)
    CVID is a group of disorders that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). People with CVID have low levels of infection-fighting antibodies in their blood. This makes it hard for them to fight off infections and illness. CVID can occur in children, but it is most common in young adults.
  • Hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM)
    Hyper-IgM syndrome is a disorder that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). People with HIGM do not have enough of the most efficient infection-fighting antibodies. They usually have very low levels of both immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). This makes it hard for them to fight off infections and illness.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)
    CGD is a disorder that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). It causes some infection-fighting white blood cells to be unable to break down bacteria. This makes it hard for people with CGD to get rid of certain types of bacteria and fungi, making them open to getting skin and lung infections.
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS)
    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a disorder that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). People with WAS have very low numbers of platelets, the cells that cause blood to stick together (clot). This can cause problems with bleeding. Because WAS also affects the immune cells that fight infections, people with this disorder can get infections easily.
  • Immune dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-linked (IPEX)
    IPEX is a disorder that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). People with IPEX lack a type of white blood cell that regulates the immune system, the body’s natural defense against disease. Without the regulating white blood cell, the immune system can attack parts of the body itself. This can cause diarrhea, rash and sometimes diabetes.
  • Hyper-IgE Syndrome (HIES)
    Hyper-IgE syndrome is a disorder that can be passed on from parent to child (genetic). It causes cells in the immune system to react abnormally to infections. This makes it hard for people with HIES to fight off infections, especially in the lungs and skin.

For additional information, as well as the steps required for testing for these conditions, please contact the CII Immunology Diagnostic Laboratory.

For Appointments:

Telephone/Fax:
Immunology Main Phone: (206) 987-7450
Immunology Main Fax: (206) 987-3890
Scheduling Clinic Appointments: (206) 987-7450 Option 1
Immunology Intake Fax Line for Physician Referrals: (206) 985-3121
New Appointment Request Form (PDF)

To reach the Immunologist on call: (206) 987-2000 (Switchboard)

Address:
Immunology Clinic:
Seattle Children's Hospital
Division of Immunology
4800 Sand Point Way NE
P.O. Box 5371/MB.8.501
Seattle, WA 98105
Map & directions

Immunology Clinic Hours:
8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Tuesdays
9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Thursdays

Immunology Faculty location:
Seattle Children's Research Institute
1900 Ninth Avenue
Mail-Stop: C9S-7
Seattle, WA 98101

If you would like a referral to the Immunology Division, please talk to your primary care provider.

For more information on this specialty, please visit the Immunology webpage.