Bike to Campus

Many Paths to UW

Discovering a bike route to campus

Dubs lying next to a map

UW Bike Commuters get to campus from all over Seattle and beyond. On this page we have collected some of the most popular major routes from nearby neighborhoods, along with tips from the commuters who use them, in their own words. Click on your zip code for some inspiration on how you might bicycle to campus. If your zip code isn’t listed here or these routes aren’t quite right for where you live or how you ride, get in touch with the Commute Concierge team for individualized bike commute information.

Considering riding one of these routes for the first time?

Riding on a Sunday morning or other low-traffic time as a test run can help you evaluate if a new route works for you without the pressure of other traffic and the time-crunch of needing to arrive at a particular time. For more tips on getting started, see our biking to campus page.

Happy riding! Thanks to all the UW bike commuters who helped contribute to this resource.

98103

98103 map

Interurban Trail to 77th Greenway to Ravenna via Greenlake

  1. Take residential streets to the Interurban Trail/Fremont Ave N (Neighborhood Greenway), head south
  2. Left on 77th (Neighborhood Greenway)
  3. Merge onto Greenlake Way N(Bike lane)
  4. Left on NE Ravenna Blvd(Bike lane) – Signal and merge early into the left turn lane and make eye contact with drivers before you proceed through this 5-way intersection)
  5. Right on 12th Ave (Neighborhood Greenway)
  6. Take 43rd, or switch over to the Ave and take 40th onto campus and your destination

Notes on going home and alternate routes: A popular alternative to 77th is to take Greenlake Drive N up to 83rd, where there is another traffic light crossing Aurora Ave N. 83rd is a good low-traffic route to north Ballard/Crown Hill

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“It’s almost all on bike lanes and one way roads without buses or many stop lights and is fairly flat. I love my commute!” - Katie Benziger, Cardiology Fellow
Katie accesses Ravenna Blvd via Winona and east Green Lake Drive
“Greenlake is very pretty. I enjoy spying pretty trees and ducks and dogs on my commute in the morning” - Lindsay, Transportation Services
“When turning from Green Lake to Green Lake (by the Blue Water Cafe and Dukes) you have to merge with traffic. You also have to do this when turning onto Ravenna from Green Lake, and when turning right from Ravenna onto Roosevelt.” - Jen Davison, Research Scientist, College of the Environment Marketing and Communications team
“Around Green Lake and along Ravenna, where traffic is heavier, there are bike lanes. The wide bike lane along Ravenna is particularly nice to ride on, being recently surfaced, and quite well separated from the cars.” - Colm Flynn, Digital Media Systems Specialist, UWEO
“I enjoy the large bike lanes on Ravenna and the peaceful ride into work along Greenlake. I chose it because it offers the most direct and pleasant route and feels the safest.” - Elizabeth Guzy, Program Administrator, Environmental Health
“Merge early when crossing from Greenlake Way to Ravenna Blvd. This intersection is very complex, and it’s important to get into your lane as soon as you can so cars know your intention.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“You definitely need to keep your eyes open around Green Lake because there’s a lot of pedestrian traffic and people parking cars, the bike lanes also get narrow in some places.” - Lauren, Graduate Student, Computer Science and Engineering

Stone Way to the Burke-Gilman Trail

  1. Take residential streets to Stone Way (Bike lane), head south
  2. Left on 34th to access Burke-Gilman Trail
  3. Take trail or follow detour signs to access your campus destination

Notes on going home and alternate routes: In Wallingford, the Neighborhood Greenway on 43rd /44th is a popular alternative to 45th, and can take you to Thackery (southbound) or Latona (northbound) for access to the Burke-Gilman Trail. Those living north of 45 th may find that taking Green Lake Way N or neighborhood streets to Ravenna may work better than heading down to the trail. Fremont Ave is a popular route for those living in Fremont and Phinney, and provides a nice exercise opportunity in the uphill direction at the end of the day.

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“The bike lanes on Stone Way make me feel much safer when I do ride on this busy arterial so the City’s investment in bike lanes has helped a great deal. The rest of my commute is on residential streets which I also choose, often instead of arterials, as I believe they are generally safer to ride on, and despite the fact that the pavement is often in worse repair, with more holes and bumps.” - Elonna Marci, Grants Analyst, UW Microbiology
“Some of the most dangerous places are trail/road intersections, especially down along by Gasworks Park. I always proceed across these intersections with extreme caution and look for cars turning onto these streets.” - A UW Bike Commuter

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98117

98117 map

77th Greenway to Ravenna via Greenlake

  1. Take residential streets to N 77th st (Neighborhood Greenway), head east
  2. Merge onto Greenlake Way N (Bike lane)
  3. Left on NE Ravenna Blvd (Bike lane) – Signal and merge early into the left turn lane and make eye contact with drivers before you proceed through this 5-way intersection)
  4. Right on 12th Ave (Neighborhood Greenway)
  5. Take 43rd, or switch over to the Ave and take 40th onto campus and your destination

Notes on going home and alternate routes: A popular alternative to 77th is to take Greenlake Drive N up to 83rd, where there is another traffic light crossing Aurora Ave N. 83rd is a good low-traffic route to north Ballard/Crown Hill

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“There is little traffic on the side streets. Around Green Lake and along Ravenna, where traffic is heavier, there are bike lanes. The wide bike lane along Ravenna is particularly nice to ride on, being recently surfaced, and quite well separated from the cars.” - Colm Flynn, Digital Media Systems Specialist, UWEO
“I enjoy the large bike lanes on Ravenna and the peaceful ride into work along Greenlake. I chose it because it offers the most direct and pleasant route and feels the safest.” - Elizabeth Guzy, Program Administrator, Environmental Health
“Merge early when crossing from Greenlake Way to Ravenna Blvd. This intersection is very complex, and it’s important to get into your lane as soon as you can so cars know your intention.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“You definitely need to keep your eyes open around Green Lake because there’s a lot of pedestrian traffic and people parking cars, the bike lanes also get narrow in some places.” - Lauren, Graduate Student, Computer Science and Engineering

58th St. Greenway to the Burke-Gilman Trail via 8th Ave

  1. Take residential streets to NW 58th St (Neighborhood Greenway), head east
  2. Turn right on 8th Ave (Bike lane) – be aware of parked cars next to the bike lane, and ride further left to avoid the door swing zone.
  3. Cross Leary Way NW at the light and continue straight – cross train tracks at a right angle
  4. Slight left after tracks onto Burke-Gilman Trail
  5. Continue on the trail onto campus, then follow detour signs or U-District streets to your destination.

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“I’m not in amazing shape, so these routes give me a solid half-hour workout without sending me into cardiac arrest. They also feature really great views; Burke-Gilman in the morning along the canal and Green Lake in the evening are pretty great ways to bookend your day.” - Ursula Elspeth Owen, International Scholar Advisor, Academic Human Resources
Ursula takes 3rd Ave NW to the Burke Gilman Trail
“In general, in ANY bike lane, riders still need to be aware of cars turning from behind them and avoiding the ‘right hook’ and people turning left across traffic in front of them. This certainly applies to 8th Ave NW bike lane.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“Some of the most dangerous places are trail/road intersections, especially down along by Gasworks Park. I always proceed across these intersections with extreme caution and look for cars turning onto these streets.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“Railroad tracks - yikes. Always cross perpendicular on tracks and don’t be afraid to really slow down as you cross them.” - Lisa Rider, UW Virology
“Be very careful of cars (but especially the big work trucks) that cross the Burke between Fred Meyer and Fremont.” - Amelia Chappelle, Manager of Program Operations, GIM

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98107

98107 map

58th St. Greenway to the Burke-Gilman Trail via 8th Ave

  1. Take residential streets to NW 58th St (Neighborhood Greenway), head east
  2. Turn right on 8th Ave (Bike lane) – be aware of parked cars next to the bike lane, and ride further left to avoid the door swing zone.
  3. Cross Leary Way NW at the light and continue straight – cross train tracks at a right angle
  4. Slight left after tracks onto Burke-Gilman Trail
  5. Continue on the trail onto campus, then follow detour signs or U-District streets to your destination.

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“I love riding along the canal approaching the Fremont Bridge and looking at the water and the houseboats just past the Fremont Bridge.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“So beautiful … I feel happy and blessed to live so close to where I work.” - Keely Del Camp, MICC/L&D staff RN
“Be very careful of cars (but especially the big work trucks) that cross the Burke between Fred Meyer and Fremont.” - Amelia Chappelle, Manager of Program Operations, GIM
“Remember to use your voice or bell when passing pedestrians and other bikers, and always use lights during the dark winter commute. It is really important when crossing side streets to make sure the car drivers make eye contact and know you are there.” - Rebecca Andrews, Burke Museum
“In general, in ANY bike lane, riders still need to be aware of cars turning from behind them and avoiding the ‘right hook’ and people turning left across traffic in front of them. This certainly applies to 8th Ave NW bike lane.” - A UW Bike Commuter
“Railroad tracks - yikes. Always cross perpendicular on tracks and don’t be afraid to really slow down as you cross them.” - Lisa Rider, UW Virology

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98115

98115 map

39th Ave Greenway to the Burke-Gilman Trail

  1. Take neighborhood streets to 39th Ave NE (Neighborhood Greenway), and head south
  2. Turn left onto the Burke-Gilman Trail
  3. Follow detour signs up to Mason Road and Stevens Way to access your on-campus destination

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“The extra mile I bike to access 39th NE is well worth the effort. Every time I deviate from that route I have unpleasant encounters with cars. The Greenway is helpful in that cross street traffic is more regulated than other streets in the neighborhood which helps immensely.” - Sherry Baron, Chemical & Occupational Safety Manager, EH&S.
“People need to STOP AT STOP SIGNS. So many times I have been stopped at a stop sign waiting for cars and somebody just rides right by into traffic. Even though the route is on the trail it is important to obey all traffic laws.” - Emily, Research Coordinator
“The 39th Ave NE Greenway is nice because there are stop signs for the cross traffic and there are traffic-slowing crosswalks at the major intersections. If it’s not raining, I enjoy crossing the Union Bay Area on the gravel Wahkiakum Lane because it is more scenic and I often see wildlife. If you don’t mind biking slowly, and being mindful of the birdwatchers, other pedestrians and wildlife (I sometimes see snakes stretched across the path, sunning themselves), it is a pleasant way to get to campus, and avoids three of the busiest intersections (Blakeley, 25th Ave NE, and Pend Oreille) on the Burke- Gilman.” - A Research Scientist, Magnuson Health Sciences Center

20th to north Campus

  1. Take residential streets to 20th Ave NE (neighborhood street), head south – 20th is lower traffic south of 63rd street
  2. After crossing 45th at the light, head right and then left on Klickitat Lane - Yield to pedestrians on campus paths
  3. Continue onto E Stevens Way NE and your campus destination

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“From what I could tell it was the most straight forward path with the least elevation change. There are many other bicyclists on this street and car traffic is pretty minimal. It’s AWESOME riding over the bridge above Ravenna Park.” - Christine Tawatao, UW Librarian

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98102

98102 map

10th Ave to University Bridge

  1. Take residential streets or Broadway to 10th Ave E (Shared lane markings)
  2. Turn left on E Roanoke St (Shared with cars)
  3. Turn right on Harvard Ave E (Bike lanes part way)
  4. Turn right on eastlake Ave E (Bike lanes)
  5. Continue onto University Bridge (Bike path)
  6. Take first off-ramp towards 40th to access the Burke Gilman Trail
  7. Use trail or follow detour signs to reach your on-campus destination

Notes on going home and alternate routes: Sometimes it’s easier to use the crosswalk across eastlake to turn left onto Harvard. For some trips home, Interlaken is a good alternative to climbing 10th. Other popular routes in this zip code use Lakeview Blvd E and Boylston Ave E to reach Harvard and eastlake.

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“Beautiful views from the top of Capitol Hill, I get to beat cars going uphill and downhill. I get to go fast on the downhill.” - Amanda Tose, UW Student
“Going downhill on 10th it’s best to bike fast and in the middle of the car lane to avoid all of the parked cars on the side of the road. It gets slippery when it’s wet! Always peak around the intersections to make sure a car turning right won’t veer into your path” - Amanda Tose, UW Student
“Watch for cars trying to pass you on the off-ramp leaving the north end of the University Bridge to 40th St. Be prepared to change your route due to construction on the ramp or Burke Gilman Trail.” - A UW Bike Commuter

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98112

98112 map

Lake Washington Loop to Montlake Bridge

  1. Depending on how far south you start, take residential streets to access Martin Luther King Junior Way, 28th Ave E, or 26th Ave E.
  2. Head north on 26th Ave E (neighborhood street)
  3. Follow signs for “Lake Washington Loop,” which will take you through a succession of neighborhood streets: from 26th over to 25th to 24th.
  4. Left on E Shelby St
  5. Right on Montlake Blvd (Sidewalk)
  6. Continue across Montlake Bridge and head north on the sidewalk
  7. After passing Hec Edmundson Pavilion, use the ramp to ride up to the Hec Ed bike and pedestrian bridge over Montlake Blvd – be slow and cautious around the ramp up to the bridge, especially when you are going in the opposite direction heading home.
  8. Head up the switchback ramp on the campus side of the bridge to access Mason Rd, which will connect you to E Stevens Way NE and your campus destination

15th and 10th to University Bridge

  1. Take residential streets to access 15th Ave E (Shared lane markings)
  2. 15th Ave E turns left to become E Boston Street
  3. Turn right onto 10th Ave E (Shared lane markings)
  4. Turn left on E Roanoke St (Shared with cars)
  5. Turn right on Harvard Ave E (Bike lanes part way)
  6. Turn right on eastlake Ave E (Bike lanes)
  7. Continue onto University Bridge (Bike path)
  8. Take first off-ramp towards 40th to access the Burke Gilman Trail
  9. Use trail or follow detour signs to reach your on-campus destination

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“Beautiful views from the top of Capitol Hill, I get to beat cars going uphill and downhill. I get to go fast on the downhill.” - Amanda Tose, UW Student
“Going downhill on 10th it’s best to bike fast and in the middle of the car lane to avoid all of the parked cars on the side of the road. It gets slippery when it’s wet! Always peak around the intersections to make sure a car turning right won’t veer into your path” - Amanda Tose, UW Student
“Watch for cars trying to pass you on the off-ramp leaving the north end of the University Bridge to 40th St. Be prepared to change your route due to construction on the ramp or Burke Gilman Trail.” - A UW Bike Commuter

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98109

98109 map

Dexter Ave to Fremont Bridge and Burke-Gilman Trail

  1. Take residential streets to Dexter Ave N (Bike lane)
  2. Cross the Fremont Bridge (Sidewalk/path)
  3. Turn right onto 34th Ave (Bike lane)
  4. After crossing Stone Way, slight right onto Burke-Gilman Trail
  5. Follow trail or detour signs to your campus destination

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“Change your brake pads regularly, and there is no easy way to get back up Queen Anne Hill. I prefer the residential streets, which are steeper, over 3rd Ave. W, which is a more gentle slope but lots of traffic.” - Steven Tatge, Capital Projects Office
“Some of the most dangerous places are trail/road intersections, especially down along by Gasworks Park. I always proceed across these intersections with extreme caution and look for cars turning onto these streets.” - A UW Bike Commuter

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

98199

98199 map

Ship Canal Trail to Burke-Gilman Trail

  1. Depending on where you start, take residential streets to Thorndyke Ave W or Gilman Ave W (Bike lanes)
  2. Turn east onto W Emerson Pl (Shared with cars)
  3. Slight right onto sidewalk at the start of the Ship Canal Trail
  4. After going under the Fremont Bridge, take the first right to go up to westlake Ave
  5. Turn right onto the path next to westlake Ave
  6. Continue across the Fremont Bridge (Sidewalk/path)
  7. Turn right onto 34th Ave (Bike lane)
  8. After crossing Stone Way, slight right onto Burke-Gilman Trail
  9. Follow trail or detour signs to your campus destination

Huskies who ride this route or parts of it want you to know:

“I love riding along the canal approaching the Fremont Bridge and looking at the water and the houseboats just past the Fremont Bridge.” - A UW Bike Commuter
I meet the coolest people on the trail and in bike shops, and love to greet the ‘regulars’ on the ship canal trail and closer to my home. There’s always something to talk about.” - Toni Haun, Vision Science, SLU
“Some of the most dangerous places [on the Burke-Gilman Trail] are trail/road intersections, especially down along by Gasworks Park. I always proceed across these intersections with extreme caution and look for cars turning onto these streets.” - A UW Bike Commuter

These routes not quite right for you? Check out the Seattle Bike Map to find other bike routes in your neighborhood, or ask our Commute Concierge team to plan a door to door route just for you.

PLEASE NOTE:This commute information is provided for planning purposes and may not be perfect for your needs. There are inherent risks in all forms of travel and you should always follow your judgment when it comes to safety. You maintain sole responsibility for all risks associated with your commute choice as well as responsibility to obey all rules and signs that apply to your trip.

Other zip codes and general route planning resources

We started these route recommendations with popular routes that take roughly 30 minutes or less. We hope to expand it soon! People ride from all over our region to reach campus. Here are some resources for planning your ride:

  • Transportation Services’ Commute Concierge program is your one-stop shop for learning all about your commute options, including bicycle route planning.
  • Google Maps provides bicycle directions! Enter your start and end points and let Google do the rest.
  • Ride the City is a route planning tool that gives you three different routes to choose from. Just decide whether you want a “Direct,” “Safe,” or “Safer” route.

Bike maps

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Taking your bike on buses, vanpools and light rail

All buses and most vanpools have easy-to-load bike racks so you can pedal one way, or part way, and ride the bus or vanpool for the rest of your journey. Bus and vanpool bike racks typically hold two or three bicycles. Bikes can also be taken on Sounder commuter rail and Link light rail.

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Practice makes perfect

A practice bus-bike rack is available at the University Transportation Center at 3745 15th Ave NE. The demonstration rack is located outside the main lobby entrance, just along the front side of the building. Instructions are posted next to the bus-bike rack so feel free to practice loading and unloading your bike anytime you like. For more visual instructions on how to load and unload your bike see Metro’s Loading Your Bike on a Bus video below:

<param name=”movie”

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/ZoE2MKHM7IA?fs=1&hl=en_US”><paramname=”allowFullScreen” value=”true”>

Curious about bicycle etiquette on Sound Transit light rail trains and express buses? Check out the video below:

<param name=”movie”

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/UyP1Y9mtjas?fs=1&hl=en_US”><paramname=”allowFullScreen” value=”true”>

The recommendations on this page are by no means exhaustive. If you have questions or comments about these or other aspects of route planning or biking and transit, feel free to contact us at ucommute@uw.edu.

Interested in taking your bike skills to the next level? Consider signing up for one of Transportation Services’ free bike classes taught by certified instructors from Cascade Bicycle Club. Enjoy the ride!

Detour information

Several construction projects, including the connection of Link light rail to campus and upgrades to the Burke-Gilman Trail require detours for trail users on campus. You can find the most up-to-date detour information on our construction page, and we also encourage you to sign up for construction updates so that we can let you know about changes.