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Posted by Elise Daniel on August 17, 2010 at 9:37 am 

The conventional wisdom tells us that social media isn’t a particularly effective way to do fundraising, at least not yet. This article on SmartBlog on Social Media shares a few tips about how it actually could be done successfully. They came out of the recent Nonprofit 2.0 Unconference. Here’s one of the tips:

“Demonstrate your impact. Use your tweets, blog posts and Facebook updates to forward this narrative [about a specific person's story] and reinforce the effects of your programs. You’ll be more successful asking for donations if you’ve cultivated a relationship with potential donors, said one attendant.”

Posted by Elise Daniel
August 17, 2010 at 9:37 am
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Posted by Carla Spaccarotelli on August 16, 2010 at 5:45 pm 
Posted by Carla Spaccarotelli
August 16, 2010 at 5:45 pm
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Posted by Elise Daniel on August 4, 2010 at 2:32 pm 

 

This very good tip from blogger John Haydon definitely seems worth a try for those of you who are responsible for both an e-newsletter and a Twitter account. He does a good job of explaining how to do it in a short video.

Posted by Elise Daniel
August 4, 2010 at 2:32 pm
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Posted by Elise Daniel on August 4, 2010 at 2:22 pm 

 

These tips from nonprofit blogger Kivi Leroux Miller are pretty much common sense, but still it’s helpful to have them assembled in this clear way. Check ’em out.

Posted by Elise Daniel
August 4, 2010 at 2:22 pm
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Posted by Elise Daniel on August 3, 2010 at 2:39 pm 

This article by MarketingSherpa, which is currently behind a subscription wall, has a couple of very good points I wanted to quote here since most of us won’t be able to access it in full:

Mistake #2. Not segmenting email lists for tests

Many marketers have large email databases, but don’t know a lot about the records held within. In these cases, they may conduct an email test using their entire database — and create a muddy results picture.

‘Without segmented lists you don’t get good test results,’ says [Corey] Trent [research analyst, MarketingExperiments]. ‘You get all these people responding differently to your emails, which pulls your results in all different directions.’

Spend the time to segment your database and understand the different characteristics of the segments before you embark on email testing. The more you know about unique segments within your database prior to testing, the better chance you’ll have of finding the right messages to appeal to them.

Mistake #3. Stopping tests after one big win

‘With email more than anything, we see people get a big win and stop testing,’ says Trent.

As exciting as those big wins may be, they shouldn’t be the end of your testing process. The makeup of your email lists is constantly changing; external factors, such as the economy, also impact subscriber behavior; and your competitors’ campaigns and tactics are always changing as well.

This constant state of change means you must routinely work on the messaging, layout, calls-to-action and other elements of your email messages to ensure you’re getting the full benefit of a testing program.”

Posted by Elise Daniel
August 3, 2010 at 2:39 pm
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