Literature

A literature review is an outcome of the Who's Not at the Table? project. Analysis of these articles will contribute to the research agenda that will be developed in the project. You are encouraged to submit articles for the literature review to doit@uw.edu.

  • AccessEngineering. (2015). Building capacity to increase the participation of people with disabilities in engineering: Proceedings of a capacity-building institute. Seattle: University of Washington.
  • AccessEngineering. (2015). Equal access: Universal design of engineering departments. Seattle: University of Washington. 
  • AccessEngineering. (2015). Equal access: Universal design of engineering labs. Seattle: University of Washington.
  • AccessEngineering. (2015). Making a Makerspace? Guidelines for accessibility and universal design. Seattle: University of Washington. 
  • AccessSTEM. (2013, 2010, 2007). Broadening participation in science and engineering by welcoming participants with disabilities. Seattle: University of Washington.
  • AccessSTEM. Increasing the participation of students with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics: Lessons learned and resources from NSF's RDE projects. Seattle: University of Washington.
  • Ahmed, S. (2012). On being included: Racism and diversity in institutional life. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • Alston, R. J., Bell, T. J. & Hampton, J. L. (2002). Learning disability and career entry into the sciences: A critical analysis of attitudinal factors. Journal of Career Development, 28(4), 263-275.
  • ​Ampaw, F., & Jaeger, A. (2011). Understanding the factors affecting degree completion of doctoral women in the science and engineering fields. New Directions for Institutional Research, 152, 59-73. 
  • ​Anderson, V., Tobey, P., Keim, R., & Schafrik, J. (2012). A study of the pedagogical strategies used in support of students with learning disabilities and attitudes held by engineering faculty, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. 
  • Atherton, T., Barthelemy, R., Deconinck, W., Falk, M., Garmon, S., Long, E., . . . Reeves, K. (2016). LGBT Climate in physics: Building an inclusive community. College Park, MD: American Physical Society.
  • Bell, A. M., Griffin, P. (1997). Teaching for diversity and social justice: A sourcebook. New York: Routledge.
  • Biesta, G.  (2007). Why "what works" won’t work: Evidence-based practice and the democratic deficit in educational research. Educational Theory 57(1), 1-22.
  • Bigelow, K. E. (2015). Raising awareness of universal design in the engineering curriculum: Strategies and reflections. In Universal Design in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice. Harvard Education Press (pp. 297–306).
  • Blaser, B., Steele, K.M., & Burgstahler, S.B. (2015). Including universal design in engineering courses to attract diverse students. Proceedings from the ASEE Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA.
  • Borrego, M., Douglas, E.  P., & Amelink, C. T. (2009). Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods in engineering education. Journal or Engineering Education, 98, 53-66. 
  • Burgstahler, S. (1994). Increasing the representation of people with disabilities in science, engineering and mathematics. Information Technology and Disability, 1(4).
  • Burgstahler, S. (2011). Universal design: Implications for computing education. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 11(3).
  • Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2015). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (2nd edition). Cambridge: Harvard Education Press.
  • Burgstahler, S., & Chang, C. (2008). Gender differences in perceived value of components of a program to promote academic and career success for students with disabilities. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities, 12(1).
  • Burgstahler, S., & Doe, T. (2004). Disability-related simulations: If, when, and how to use themReview of Disability Studies, 1(2), 4-17.
  • Cech, E. A. and Waidzunas. T. (2011). Navigating the heteronormativity of engineering: The experiences of lesbian, gay, and bisexual students. Engineering Studies, 3(1): 1–24.
  • Center for Universal Design. (n.d.). History of universal design. Retrieved from http://www.ncsu.edu/project/design-projects/udi/center-for-universal-des...
  • Cheryan, S., Ziegler, S. A., Montoya, A. K., & Jiang, L. (2016). Why are some STEM fields more gender balanced than others?. Psychological Bulletin, No Pagination Specified. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bul0000052.
  • Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering (CEOSE). (2013).
    Broadening participation in America's STEM workforce. The 2011-2012 Biennial
    Reports to Congress. NSF: Author. Retrieved from
    http://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/activities/ceose/reports/Full_2011-2012_CEOSE_Repo
    rt_to_Congress_Final_03-04-2014.pdf
  • Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering, and Technology Development (2000, September). Land of plenty: Diversity as America's competitive edge in science, engineering and technology. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Clare, E. (2001). Stolen bodies, reclaimed bodies: Disability and queerness. Public Culture, 13(3), 359–365.
  • Crenshaw, K. Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory, and Antiracist PoliticsUniversity of Chicago Legal Forum, 1989(1), 8.
  • DePoy, E., & Gibson, S. (2008). Disability studies: Origins, current conflict, and resolution. Review of Disability Studies, 4(4), 33–40.
  • DePoy, E., & Gibson, S. (2008). Healing the disjuncture: Social work disability practice. In K. M. Sowers & C. N. Dulmus (Series Eds.), & B. W. White (Vol. Ed.), Comprehensive handbook of social work and social welfare: Volume 1, The profession of social work (pp. 267–282). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT). (1993–2015). DO-IT Snapshots. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from http://www.uw.edu/doit/programs/do-it-scholars/snapshots
  • Duerstock, B. S., & Shingledecker, C. A. (Eds.) (2014). From college to careers: fostering inclusion of persons with disabilities in STEM. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
  • ​Dumais, S.A., & Ward, A. (2009). Cultural capital and first-generation college success. Poetics, 38, 245-265. 
  • Dunn, C., Rabren, K. S, Taylor, S. L, & Dotson, C. K. (2012). Assisting students with high-incidence disabilities to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Intervention in School and Clinic, 48(1), 47-54.
  • Eschenbach, E.A., Virnoche, M., Lord, S.M., & Madsen, M. (2014). Special session-“stereotype threat” and my students: What can I do about it?. American Society of Engineering Education.
  • Fifield, S. & Letts, W. (2014). [Re]considering queer theories and science education. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 9, 393-407.
  • ​Fouad, N., Fitzpatrick, M., & Liu, J.P. (2011). Persistence of women in engineering careers: A qualitative study of current and former female engineers. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 17(1), 69-96.   
  • Gil-Kashiwabara, E., Hogansen, J. M., Geenan, S., Powers, K., & Powers, L. E. (2007). Improving transition outcomes for marginalized youth. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 30(2), 80–91.
  • Gabel, S., & Peters, S. (2010). Presage of a paradigm shift: Beyond the social model of disability toward resistance theories of disability. Disability & Society, 19(6), 585–600.
  • George, Y. S., Neale, D. S., Van Horne, V. & Malcom, S. M. (2001). In pursuit of a diverse science, technology, engineering, and mathematics workforce. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • Grout, I. (2015). Supporting access to STEM subjects in higher education for students with disabilities using remote laboratories. Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation (REV), 2015 12th International Conference on, 7-13.
  • Grzanka, P. R. and Brian, J.D. (2015). 'Analytical dispositions' and the shared affinities of science & technology studies and intersectionality. Talk delivered by Patrick Grzanka at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Gupta, U., & Houtz, L. (2000). High school students’ perceptions of information technology skills and careers. Journal of Industrial Technology, 16(4).
  • ​Habrowski, F., & Maton, K. I. (2009). Change institutional culture, and you change who goes into science. Academe, 95(3), 11-15.
  • Harry, B. , & Klingner, J. (2007). Discarding the deficit model. Educational Leadership, 64(5), 16-21. 
  • ​Hausmann, L. R., Ye, F., Schofield, J. W., & Woods, R. L. (2009). Sense of belonging and persistence in White and African American first-year students. Research in Higher Education, 50(7), 649-669.
  • ​Hoffman, M., Richmond, J., Morrow, J., & Salomone, K. (2002). Investigating “sense of belonging” in first-year college students. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice, 4(3), 227-256.
  • Institute for Broadening Participation. (2014). Pathways to science.
    Retrieved from http://www.pathwaystoscience.org/
  • Jackson, D. L., Starobin, S. S., & Laanan, F. S. (2013). The shared experiences: Facilitating successful transfer of women and underrepresented minorities in STEM fields. New Directions for Higher Education, (162), 69-76.
  • Jacobs, J. E., & Simpkins, S. D. (Eds.) (2006). Leaks in the pipeline to math, science, and technology careers: New directions for child development, No. 110. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • ​Johnson, M.J. & Sheppard, D.D. (2004). Relationships between engineering student and faculty demographics and stakeholders working to affect change. Journal of Engineering Education, 92(2), 137-151.
  • ​Joughin, G. (2010). The hidden curriculum revisited: a critical review of research into the influence of summative assessment on learning. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(3), 335-345. 
  • Kiernan, V. (2000). Government challenged to make high-tech careers more attractive. Laser Focus World (June). Retrieved from http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-36/issue-6/departme...
  • Ladner, R. (2009). Persons with disabilities: Broadening participation and accessibility research. Computing Research News, 21(2). Retrieved from http://cra.org/resources/crn-archive-view-detail/persons_with_disabiliti...
  • Leake, D., Burgstahler, S., Rickerson, N., Applequist, K., Izzo, M., Arai, M., & Picklesimer, T. (2006). Literature synthesis of key issues in supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students with disabilities to succeed in postsecondary education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 18(2), 149–165.
  • Lee, A. (2011). A comparison of postsecondary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) enrollment for students with and without disabilities. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 34(2), 72-82.
  • Lee, A. (2014). Students with disabilities choosing science technology engineering and math (STEM) majors in postsecondary institutions. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 27(3), 261-272.
  • ​Lent, R., Brown, S., & Hackett, G. (1994). Toward a unifying social cognitive theory of career and academic interest, choice, and performance. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 45(1), 79 -122.
  • Loewen, G., & Pollard, W. (2010). The social justice perspective. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 23(1), 5–18.
  • Malcom, S. M., Hall, P. Q., & Brown, J. W. (1976). The double bind. The prince of being a minority woman in science (No. 76-R-3). Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
  • Malcom-Piqueux, L. E., & Malcom, S.E. (2013) Engineering diversity: Fixing the educational system to promote education. The Bridge, 43(1) 24-34.
  • Margolis, J., Estrella, R., Goode, J., Holme, J. J., & Nao, K. (2010). Stuck in the shallow end: Education, race, and computing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Margolis, J. & Fisher, A. (2001). Unlocking the clubhouse: Women in computing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Martin, J. K., Stumbo, N. J., Martin, L. G., Collins, K. D., Hedrick, B. N., Nordstrom, D., & Peterson, M. (2011). Recruitment of students with disabilities: Exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(4), 285-299.
  • ​Marx, S. (2016). Qualitative research in STEM: Studies of equity, access, and innovation.
  • Maton, K. I., Pollard, S.A., McDougall, T.V., & Hrabowski, F. A. (2012). Meyerhoff scholars program: A strengths-based, institution-wide approach to increasing diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Mount. Sinai Journal of Medicine: A Journal of Translation and Personalized Medice, 79(5), 610-623.
  • ​Matusovich, H., Streveler, R.A., & Miller, R.L. (2013). Why do students choose engineering? A qualitative, longitudinal investigation of students’ motivational values. Journal of Engineering Education, 99(4), 289-303. 
  • McRuer, R. Crip Theory. New York: New York University Press, 2006.
  • ​Monkman, K., Ronald, M., & Thèramène, F.D. (2005). Social and cultural capital’s influence on the academic achievement of African American and Latino males. The Review of Higher Education, 33(3), 307-332.  
  • Moriarty, M. A. (2007). Inclusive pedagogy: Teaching methodologies to reach diverse learners in science instruction. Equity and Excellence in Education, 40(3), 252–265.
  • National Center for Education Statistics. (2009). Students who study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in postsecondary education (NCES 2009-161). Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2009/2009161.pdf
  • National Council on Disability and Social Security Administration. (2000). Transition and post-school outcomes for youth with disabilities: Closing the gaps to post-secondary education and employment. Washington, DC: Author.
  • National Science Foundation. (2016). Women, minorities and persons with disabilities in science and engineering: 2015. Washington, D.C.: Author.
  • National Science Foundation. (2014). Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering: 2013. Arlington, VA: U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/
  • National Science Foundation. (2011). Empowering the nation through discovery and innovation: NSF strategic plan for fiscal years 2011–2016. Arlington, VA: Author.
  • National Science Foundation. (2008). Survey of earned doctorates. Custom table.
  • National Science Foundation. (2006). Investing in America’s future: Strategic plan FY 2006–2011. Arlington, VA: Author.
  • Office of Disability Employment Policy. (2001, November). Improving the availability of community-based services for people with disabilities. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Osborne, N. J. (2015). Student veteran discussion panels: Deconstructing the traumatized veteran stigma on campus. About Campus 19(2), 24-29.
  • Oslund, C. (2013). Succeeding as a student in the STEM fields with an invisible disability : A college handbook for science, technology, engineering, and math students with autism, ADD, affective disorders, or learning difficulties and their families. London; Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley.
  • Painter, Nell Irvin. The History of White People. New York, Norton & Co, 2010.
  • Palmer, R., & Wood, J. L. (2013). Community colleges and STEM : Examining underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Pawley, A. L. & Phillips, C. M. L. (2014). From the mouths of students: Two cases of narrative analysis to understand engineering education’s ruling relations as gendered and raced. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN.
  • Pawley, A.L. & Slaton, A. E. (2015). Saving the Small-N. In proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition, Chicago, IL. Seattle, WA: ASEE.
  • Riley, D. M. (2014). What’s wrong with evidence? Epistemological roots and pedagogical implications of ‘evidence-based practice’ in STEM education.” In proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN.
  • Riley, D. M. & Claris, L.  (2006). “Power/Knowledge: Using Foucault to promote critical understandings of content and pedagogy in engineering thermodynamics.” In Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition, Chicago, IL. Washington, DC: ASEE.
  • Rule, A. C., Stefanich, G. P., & Boody, R. M. (2011). The impact of a working conference focused on supporting students with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(4), 351-367.
  • Seymour, E. (1998). Talking about disability: The education and work experience of graduates and undergraduates with disabilities in science, mathematics, and engineering majors. Ethnography & Evaluation Research, Bureau of Sociological Research, University of Colorado.
  • Siebers, T. (1995). Disability Theory. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Slaton, A. E. (2010). Race, Rigor and Selectivity in US Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color-Line. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Slaton, A. E. (2013). “Body? What Body? Considering Ability and Disability in STEM Disciplines.” Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition, Atlanta, GA. Washington, DC: ASEE.
  • Slaton, A. E., & Pawley, A. E. (2015). The power and politics of STEM research design: saving the "Small N"." American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition.
  • Smart, J. F., & Smart, D. W. (2006). Models of disability: Implications for the counseling profession. Journal of Counseling & Development, 84(1), 29-40.
  • ​Smith, B. (2014). Mentoring at-risk students through the hidden curriculum of higher education. Plymouth, United Kingdom: Lexington Books. 
  • ​Smith, J. M., & Lucena, J. C. (2016). Invisible innovators: How low-income, first-generation students use their funds of knowledge to belong in engineering. Engineering Studies, 8(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19378629.2016.1155593
  • ​SRI International. (n.d.). Reports and products and data tables. Menlo Park, CA: Author. Retrieved from http://www.nlts2.org/products.html
  • Starobin, S. S., Laanan, F. J., & Burger, C. (2010). Role of community colleges: Broadening participation among women and minorities in stem. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 16(1), 1-5.
  • ​Strayhorn, T.L. (2010). When race and gender collide: Social and cultural capital’s influence on the academic achievement of African American and Latino males. The Review of Higher Education, 33(3), 307-332. 
  • Stern, V., & Woods, M. (2001). Roadmaps and rampways. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • STEM special issue. (2011). Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability,  24(4). Association of Higher Education and Disability.
  • Thomas, T., & Allen, A. (2006). Gender differences in students’ perceptions of information technology as a career. Journal of Information Technology Education, 5, 165–178.
  • ​Tsui, L. (2010). Overcoming barriers. Engineering program environments that support women. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 16(2), 137-160.
  • Turner, S. V., Bernt, P. W., & Pecora, N. (April, 2002). Why women choose information technology careers: Educational, social, and familial influences. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New Orleans, LA.
  • White, J. L., & Massiha, G. H. (2015). Strategies to increase representation of students with disabilities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). International Journal of Evaluation and Research in Education, 4(3), 89-93.
  • Wulf, W. A. (2000). How shall we satisfy the long-term educational needs of engineers? Proceedings of the IEEE, 88(4), 593–596.
  • Yuen, T., Ek, L., & Scheutze, A. (2013). Increasing participation from underrepresented minorities in STEM through robotics clubs. Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering (TALE), 2013 IEEE International Conference on, 24-28.