Chapter 8: Resources and Resources

Image of Scholars working hard on their projects on their laptops

This chapter includes references and information about web resources, video presentations, and training materials available from DO-IT.

DO-IT Web Pages

The following DO-IT web pages are of particular relevance for creating programs that help students with disabilities succeed in college and careers and use technology as an empowering tool.

AccessCAREERS
Resources that include a searchable knowledge base of questions and answers, case studies, and promising practices that promote career success for people with disabilities.
www.washington.edu/doit/Careers

AccessCollege: Postsecondary Education and Students with Disabilities
Resources for students and educators that promote postsecondary success for students with disabilities.
www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/postsec.html

AccessComputing
Resources that include a searchable knowledge base of questions and answers, case studies, and promising practices that promote participation of individuals with disabilities in computing careers.
www.washington.edu/accesscomputing

AccessSTEM
Resources that include a searchable knowledge base of questions and answers, case studies, and promising practices that promote participation of individuals with disabilities in STEM careers.
www.washington.edu/doit/Stem

DO-IT Pals
An e-mentoring community for teens with disabilities.
www.washington.edu/doit/Programs/pals.html

DO-IT Publications, Videos, and Training Materials
Products that promote the success of people with disabilities in challenging academic programs and careers, using technology as an empowering tool.
www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/

DO-IT: Research to Practice
A summary of research on which DO-IT practices are based.
www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/research.html

DO-IT Scholars Program
A multiple-year transition program to help teens with disabilities prepare for college and careers.
www.washington.edu/doit/Programs/scholar.html

DO-IT Snapshots: Bios of the DO-IT Scholars
Bios written by current and past DO-IT Scholars.
www.washington.edu/doit/Snapshots

Technology and Universal Design
Video presentations and web resources about assistive technology and universal design of information technology.
www.washington.edu/doit/resources/popular-resource-collections/accessible-technology

Group picture of the interns.

DO-IT Video Presentations

The following video productions are available on DVDs for purchase through DO-IT and are available for free online viewing at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/vidlist.html. Trainers who wish to have copies of DO-IT videos to store on their computers for noncommercial purposes can obtain copies without charge by making a request to doit@u.washington.edu.

DO-IT Programs 1

DO-IT Pals: An Internet Community
Peer and mentor support in an online community for people with disabilities (9 minutes).

DO-IT Scholars
Participants tell about the DO-IT Scholars program for high school students with disabilities (11 minutes).

Snapshots: The DO-IT Scholars
Participants tell about their experiences in DO-IT programs (28 minutes).

Finding Gold: Hiring the Best and the Brightest
Employers in work-based learning programs show how to fully include participants with disabilities (7 minutes).

DO-IT Programs 2

How DO-IT Does It
Successful practices employed by DO-IT programs to increase the success of young people with disabilities in college and careers (34 minutes).

Opening Doors: Mentoring on the Internet
Adult mentors help students with disabilities achieve success in college studies and careers (14 minutes).

DO-IT Self-Determination 1

Taking Charge 1: Three Stories of Success and Self-Determination
Successful young people with disabilities share strategies for living self-determined adult lives (17 minutes).

Taking Charge 2: Two Stories of Success and Self-Determination
Testimonials from teens with disabilities learning to live self-determined lives, featuring two high school students (15 minutes).

Taking Charge 3: Five Stories of Success and Self Determination
A combination of the stories presented in Taking Charge 1 and 2 videos. Testimonials from successful people with disabilities regarding living self-determined lives, featuring five individuals in high school, college, and careers (27 minutes).

DO-IT STEM 1

Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities
Successful science students with disabilities suggest ways to make science activities accessible (13 minutes).

Equal Access: Science and Students with Sensory Impairments
Students and employees with sensory impairments share strategies for success (14 minutes).

The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science
Science and math teachers share strategies for making these subject areas accessible to students with a wide range of disabilities (15 minutes).

STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics at the University of Washington
Students and faculty highlight exciting academic programs offered to a diverse students body at the University of Washington (10 minutes).

DO-IT Careers 1

Learn and Earn: Tips for Teens
Students with disabilities show how they benefit from work-based learning (13 minutes).

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens
Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens to participate in work-based learning (13 minutes).

It's Your Career
College students with disabilities gain work-based learning experiences (13 minutes).

Access to the Future: Preparing Students with Disabilities for Careers
How to make college career development services accessible to students with disabilities (14 minutes).

DO-IT Technology 1

Working Together: People with Disabilities and Computer Technology
Adaptive technology and computer applications for people with disabilities (14 minutes).

Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments
People with mobility impairments demonstrate computer access technology (14 minutes).

Working Together: Computers and People with Sensory Impairments
People with visual and hearing impairments demonstrate computer technology for school and work (11 minutes).

Working Together: Computers and People with Learning Disabilities
Students and workers with learning disabilities demonstrate computer-based tools and strategies (10 minutes).

Computer Access: In Our Own Words
Students with disabilities demonstrate adaptive technology and computer applications (10 minutes).

DO-IT Technology 2

Equal Access: Universal Design of Computer Labs
This presentation shows how computer labs can be designed as to be accessible to students with disabilities (11 minutes).

World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design
People with disabilities describe roadblocks they encounter on the World Wide Web and examples of accessible web design techniques (11 minutes).

Real Connections: Making Distance Learning Accessible to Everyone
This presentation highlights issues to consider when designing courses to fully include students with disabilities (12 minutes).

Access to Technology in the Workplace: In Our Own Words
Testimonials from employees on making technology accessible in the workplace (13 minutes).

Camp: Beyond Summer
How to add Internet experiences to summer camp programs for children and youth with disabilities (10 minutes).

DO-IT Transition 1

College: You Can DO-IT!
College students with disabilities and staff share advice for success in college (14 minutes).

Moving On: The Two-Four Step
How to successfully transition from two- to four-year postsecondary institutions (11 minutes).

Taking Charge 1: Three Stories of Success and Self-Determination
Testimonials from successful people with disabilities regarding living self-determined lives (17 minutes).

DO-IT College 1

Working Together: Faculty and Students with Disabilities
Successful students with disabilities tell the viewers firsthand about techniques and accommodations that contributed to their success. They emphasize the importance of the faculty-student relationship (9 minutes).

Building the Team: Faculty, Staff, and Students Working Together
Learn how to create an inclusive postsecondary learning environment (16 minutes).

Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction
Learn strategies for making instruction in a classroom or in a tutoring center accessible to all students (13 minutes).

Equal Access: Student Services
How to apply universal design principles to make postsecondary student services accessible to all students (15 minutes).

Image of three Scholars gather around two laptops, brainstorming.

DO-IT Publications

The following DO-IT publications, ready for duplication, can be distributed to staff and/or transition program participants.

  • An Accommodation Model
  • Building the Team: Faculty, Staff, and Students Working Together
  • College Funding Strategies for Students with Disabilities
  • College Survival Skills
  • College: You Can DO-IT!
  • Disability-Related Resources on the Internet
  • Learn and Earn: Tips for Teens
  • Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens
  • Making Science Labs Accessible to Students with Disabilities
  • Opening Doors: Mentoring on the Internet
  • Preparing for a Career: An Online Tutorial
  • Preparing for College: An Online Tutorial
  • Taking Charge: Stories of Success and Self-Determination
  • Universal Design of Instruction: Definitions, Principles, and Examples
  • The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science
  • Working Together: Computers and People with Learning Disabilities
  • Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments
  • Working Together: Computers and People with Sensory Impairments
  • Working Together: People with Disabilities and Computer Technology
  • Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities

The most current editions of these and other publications are freely available online at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/. Permission is granted to duplicate and distribute them for noncommercial purposes, provided the source is acknowledged.

Image of a Scholar working on a science experiment.

Electronic Resources

The following resources provide a good place to start as you continue your exploration of ways to encourage college-bound young people to reach their highest potential in school, in careers, and in other life experiences.

ABLEDATA
www.abledata.com

AccessCAREERS
www.washington.edu/doit/Careers

AccessCollege
www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/postsec.html

Adolescent Health Transition Project
https://innovations.ahrq.gov/qualitytools/adolescent-health-transition-project

The Alliance for Technology Access
http://www.icdri.org/community/ata.htm

American Association of People with Disabilities
www.aapd.com

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) National Network
www.adata.org

The Arc
www.thearc.org

Be a Mentor Program
www.beamentor.org

Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST)
www.cast.org

Center for Self-Determination
www.self-determination.com

Child Safety on the Information Highway: National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
www.safekids.com/child-safety-on-the-information-highway

College Preparation Resources for Students with Disabilities
www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/college_prep.html

DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology)
www.washington.edu/doit

DisABILITY Information and Resources
www.makoa.org

E-Volunteerism
www.evolunteerism.com

Family Village: A Global Community of Disability Related Resources
www.familyvillage.wisc.edu

Got a Good Mentor? Hold Up Your End of the Bargain
www.esight.org/index.cfm?x=1319

HEATH Resource Center
heath.gwu.edu

Institute on Community Integration
ici.umn.edu

The International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet (ICDRI)
www.icdri.org

Internet Safety: A Note to Parents, Guardians and Teachers World Kids Network
www.worldkids.net/school/safety/internet/guidance.html

Job Accommodation Network
www.askjan.org

Kids as Self-Advocates (KASA)
www.fvkasa.org

Kidz Privacy: Adults Only Federal Trade Commission
www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/edcams/kidzprivacy/adults.htm

Kid Source Online
www.kidsource.com

Kids Together, Inc. Information and Resources for Children & Adults with Disabilities
www.kidstogether.org

Kid Zone: Where Kids Can Play and Learn
www.ldonline.org/kids

The Librarian's Guide to Cyberspace for Parents & Kids American Library Association​
http://www.ccpl-fl.net/Kids/greatsitesbrochure.pdf

Mapping Your Future
www.mappingyourfuture.org

MentorNet: The E-Mentoring Network for Diversity in Engineering and Science
www.mentornet.net

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET)
www.ncset.org

National Council on Independent Living
www.ncil.org

National Council on Disability
www.ncd.gov

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
www.nichcy.org

National Mentoring Center
www.nwrel.org/mentoring

National Mentoring Partnership
www.mentoring.org

National Organization on Disabilities
www.nod.org

National Youth Development Information Center
www.nydic.org/nydic

National Youth Leadership Network
www.nyln.org

The OHSU Center on Self-Determination
www.ohsu.edu/oidd/CSD

PACER (Parent Advocacy Coalition for Education Rights)
www.pacer.org

A Parent's Guide to Internet Safety Federal Bureau of Investigation
www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/parent-guide

People First
www.peoplefirst.org

Self-Determination Synthesis Project
www.uncc.edu/sdsp

ServiceLeader.org Virtual Volunteering
www.serviceleader.org/virtual

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html

Think College
U.S. Department of Education
www.thinkcollege.net

U.S. Department of Labor Employment & Training Administration
www.doleta.gov

Winners On Wheels
www.wowusa.com

What a Mentor Can Do for You
www.esight.org/index.cfm?x=1198

World Friends, Resources, and Disabilities
www.seattleschools.org/schools/hale/friends/wf_home.htm

World Institute on Disability
www.wid.org

Image of a Scholar in a wheelchair receiving an award.

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