Building Capacity for a Welcoming and Accessible Postsecondary Institution

Cover image for Building Capacity for a Welcoming and Accessible Postsecondary Institution
Editor: Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D.

Building Capacity for a Welcoming and Accessible Postsecondary Institution is available in HTML and PDF versions. For the HTML version, follow the table of contents below. For the PDF version, go to Building Capacity for a Welcoming and Accessible Postsecondary Institution - PDFs.

© 2007 University of Washington. Permission is granted to copy these materials for educational, noncommercial purposes provided the source is acknowledged.

This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education (#P333A050064). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement of the federal government.

About the Contributors

A team of professionals, representing postsecondary institutions from twenty states throughout the United States, gathered in collaborative meetings and online and telephone conferences to help develop and test the professional development content and strategies included in these materials. Their continuous involvement in the AccessCollege project assured that project products have applicability nationwide. AccessCollege is funded by the U.S. Department of Education (grant #P333A050064), through DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington.

AccessCollege Team members in two rows pose for photo.

AccessCollege staff and team members:

  • develop and deliver professional development and technical assistance using multiple delivery systems
  • validate campus accessibility indicators and use pre-post checklists to document institutional changes in policies, procedures, and practices that lend to campuses that are more inclusive of students with disabilities
  • prepare content to be published in a book on universal design in postsecondary education, as well as distribute training videos, publications, and web resources to train faculty and staff on applications of universal design
  • improve the accessibility of activities and products of professional organizations

Project methods will result in postsecondary institutions and professional organizations that are more inclusive of people with disabilities. Ultimately, AccessCollege will increase the success of individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education and careers.

AccessCollege Staff

DO-IT staff members who work on the AccessCollege project include:

Sheryl Burgstahler, Director
Michael Richardson, Manager
Rebecca C. Cory, Evaluation/Research Coordinator
Marvin Crippen, Technology Specialist
Elizabeth Moore, External Evaluator
Rebekah Peterson, Publications Coordinator
Lisa Stewart, Project Coordinator
Linda Tofle, Editor

AccessCollege Team

AccessCollege team members are listed below.

Alice Anderson
Technology Access Program Coordinator
Division of Information Technology
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Madison, WI
Partner: Madison Area Technical College,
Madison, WI

Beatrice Awoniyi
Assistant Dean of Students
Director of Student Disability Resource Center
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL
Partner: Tallahassee Community College and Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL

Meryl Berstein
Director, The Center for Academic Support
Johnson and Wales University
Providence, RI
Partner: Community College of Rhode Island, Warwick, RI

Sharon Bittner
Director, Academic Support Services
Des Moines Area Community College
Ankeny, IA
Partner: Iowa State University, Ames, IA

Barbara Brown
Academic Counselor
Kodiak College
Kodiak, AK
Partner: University of Alaska, Anchorage

Deborah Casey-Powell
Assistant Dean of Student Services
Green River Community College
Auburn, WA

Adele Darr
Director, Disability Resource Center
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ
Partner: South Mountain Community College, Phoenix, AZ

Tim Dailey
Director of Disability Services for Students
Southwestern Oregon Community College
Coos Bay, OR
Partner: University of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Jim Gorske
Assistant Dean of Students/Director of Disability Resource Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL
Partner: Greenville Technical College,
Greenville, SC

Pam Griffin
General Disability Services Coordinator, Disability Services & Resources
University of Minnesota–Duluth
Duluth, MN
Partner: Fond Du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN

Grace T. Hanson
Director of Disabled Student Services
Mt. San Antonio College
Walnut, CA
Partner: California State University–Long Beach, Long Beach, CA

Dyane Haynes
Director of Disability Resources for Students
University of Washington
Seattle, WA
Partner: Seattle University, Seattle, WA

Elaine High
Learning Disabilities Specialist
Virginia Walker
Cognitive Disabilities and Brain Injury/ Student-Athlete Liaison
Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Partner: Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI

Melissa Locher
Coordinator for Disability Services
Missouri Southern State University
Joplin, MO
Partner: Crowder Community College,
Neosho, MO

Rodney Pennamon
Director of Disability Services
The Margaret A. Staton Office of Disability Services
Georgia State University
Atlanta, GA
Partner: Georgia Perimeter College,
Clarkston, GA

Patricia Richter
Coordinator, Services for Americans with Disabilities
Office of Human Diversity
Kutztown University
Kutztown, PA
Partner: Lehigh Carbon Community College, Schnecksville, PA

Sharon Robertson
Assistant Director of Student Success Center
University of Tennessee at Martin
Martin, TN
Partner: Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN

Rosezelia Roy
Coordinator, Students with Disabilities Program
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA
Partner: J. Sargeant Reynolds Community
College, Richmond, VA

Audrey Annette Smelser
Counselor/Disability Specialist
Student Support Services
National Park Community College
Hot Springs, AR
Partner: Henderson State University,
Arkadelphia, AR

Al Souma
Counselor, Disability Support Services
Seattle Central Community College
Seattle, WA
Partner: Seattle University, Seattle, WA

Suzanne Tucker
Coordinator, Disability Resource Office
Southern Connecticut State University
New Haven, CT
Partner: Gateway Community College,
New Haven, CT

Linda Walter
Director, Disability Support Services
Seton Hall University
South Orange, NJ
Partner: Raritan Valley Community College, Somerville, NJ


Acknowledgments

DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington has, since 1992, worked to increase the successful participation of individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education and employment. It sponsors projects that promote the use of assistive technology and the development of accessible facilities, computer labs, electronic resources in libraries, web pages, educational multimedia, and distance learning programs. DO-IT is a collaboration of Computing & Communications and the Colleges of Engineering and Education at the University of Washington. Primary funding for DO-IT is provided by the National Science Foundation, the State of Washington, and the U.S. Department of Education. More information about DO-IT initiatives and projects, including AccessCollege, can be found at http://www.washington.edu/doit/.

In 1999, the U.S. Department of Education Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) funded DO-IT Prof (grant #P333A990042) to create professional development materials and train faculty and academic administrators nationwide to more fully include students with disabilities in their courses. In 2002, OPE funded DO-IT Admin (grant #P333A020044), which expanded DO-IT Prof efforts to train student service administrators and also staff. Project team members further identified the critical need to systematically change policies, procedures, and practices in order for both universal design and reasonable accommodations to be embraced at an institutional level.

AccessCollege (grant #P333A050064) continues to offer and refine the successful professional development and resources for faculty and administrators of earlier projects. It complements them with the identification, validation, and application of campus accessibility indicators (DO-IT, 2007) to document institutional change toward more accessible courses and programs. AccessCollege also supports The Center for Universal Design in Education at http://www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE/.

Much of the content for this publication is duplicated in other publications, training materials, and web pages published by DO-IT (e.g., Burgstahler, 2002, 2005, 2007 & DO-IT, 2007). Most can be found at the comprehensive website http://www.washington.edu/doit/. Permission is granted to copy these materials for educational, noncommercial purposes provided the source is acknowledged. Although the materials were developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, the contents express the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Education, and you should not assume their endorsement.

AccessCollege is a Model Demonstration Project of the Office of Postsecondary Education in the U.S. Department of Education. The purpose of these projects is to develop innovative, effective, and efficient teaching methods to enhance the skills and abilities of postsecondary faculty and administrators working with students who have disabilities. Links to all of the Model Demonstration Projects are at http://www.ed.gov/programs/disabilities/awards.html.

Introduction to Capacity Building

Photo of DO-IT Scholar smiles while riding a modified bicycle with hand peddles
 

Federal legislation mandates that no otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities shall, solely by reason of their disabilities, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in public programs and services in the United States, unless it would pose an undue burden to do so. This means that postsecondary courses, programs, and services must be accessible to qualified individuals.

Specifically, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 mandates such access within institutions that receive federal funds. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 reinforces and extends access requirements to covered entities, regardless of their funding sources. However, individuals with disabilities are underrepresented in the group of individuals who participate in postsecondary education, earn degrees, and transition to successful careers (Blackorby & Wagner, 1996; National Council on Disability of Social Security Administration, 2000; National Organization on Disability, 2004; Wagner, Newman, Cameo, & Levine, 2005).

Efforts toward making a postsecondary institution more welcoming and accessible to people with disabilities can be made by faculty, administrators of student service organizations, and other staff (DO-IT, 2007). But change for any institution can be difficult.

What are the Motivations, Objectives, and Processes for Systemic Change?

Change can be viewed from three perspectives: the reason for change, the content of change, and the process of change (Levy & Merry, 1986).

Reason for Change

Individuals as well as entire institutions may experience both internal and external pressure for change (Levin, 1998). Internal factors that might promote positive change include placing a high value on diversity and educational equity (Oliver & Barnes, 1998) and seeing individuals with disabilities as a minority group with civil rights instead of a needy population deserving charity. These factors can motivate faculty and staff to increase the accessibility of their courses and services once they become aware of accessibility barriers and accessible design strategies. Although these individuals may be motivated to learn new skills and gain knowledge that will enhance student access, a competing motivation may be the comfort and efficiency of maintaining existing standards and procedures.

Knowledge of disability-related legislation will provide external motivation for change only if the individual makes the connection between this legislation and his/her practices and responsibilities. Another promoter of change for an individual is the existence of institutional policies relative to the accessibility of courses and services. An individual with a disability who requests accommodations may motivate a faculty or staff member to help this person, but may not provide the motivation to change future practices.

Lack of time and funding are common reasons for not making programs and courses more accessible. These factors often have as their root a lack of information about how to go about making a change or looking at accessibility as a huge project rather than an ongoing effort accomplished in incremental steps.

Content of Change

Many faculty and staff are unaware of the need for accessible design and, after becoming aware, perceive that they do not have the expertise or time to deal with accessibility issues. The two negative motivational factors of lack of prerequisite knowledge and time to implement accessibility measures might be addressed by providing specific, readily-achievable suggestions that apply principles of universal design to improve accessibility and resources specifically designed for faculty and staff. They should include introductory training materials as well as searchable, detailed content (Burgstahler, 2002, 2005).

Process of Change

Members of the AccessCollege team and those of earlier DO-IT projects determined that effective outreach efforts include on-site training as part of regularly scheduled and stand-alone meetings, video presentations, short informational handouts, and comprehensive web resources and searchable knowledge bases. To promote systemic change toward a more accessible campus, the AccessCollege team developed Communities of Practice (CoPs) and Capacity-Building Institutes (CBIs).

On What Research Can Our Professional Development Rest?

DO-IT has created literature reviews that can help guide professional development of faculty (www.washington.edu/doit/TeamN/synth.html) and student services personnel (www.washington.edu/doit/AdminN/synth.html). Research syntheses support training strategies and materials and include the topics of adult learning, learning styles, types of learning, universal design, and systemic change. These materials were created in earlier projects as part of the following publications:

The content and methods for professional development include Communities of Practice and Capacity-Building Institutes. These platforms for growth are discussed in the following paragraphs, can be used to further your agenda for creating a campus that is more welcoming and accessible to people with disabilities.

How Can Universal Design Help Us Focus on Our Systemic Change Efforts?

Universal design strategies can help you create products and environments that are welcoming and accessible to all students, staff, faculty, and visitors on your campus. Universal design (UD) can be applied to instruction, services, information technology, and physical spaces, as noted below.

Instruction

  • Class Climate
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Delivery Methods
  • Information Resources/Technology
  • Interaction
  • Feedback
  • Assessment
  • Accommodation

Services

  • Planning, Policies, and Evaluation
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Staff
  • Information Resources/Technology
  • Events

Information Technology

  • Procurement/Development Policies
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Information
  • Input/Control Output
  • Manipulations
  • Safety
  • Compatibility with Assistive Technology

Physical Spaces

  • Climate, Aesthetics
  • Entrances and Routes of Travel
  • Fixtures, Furniture
  • Information Resources/Technology
  • Safety
  • Accommodation

Universal Design in Education (UDE):

  • puts high values on both diversity and inclusion
  • rests on the definition and principles developed at the Center for Universal Design, www.design.ncsu.edu/cud
  • makes products and environments welcoming, accessible, and usable by everyone
  • is a process as well as a set of guidelines and strategies for specific applications.
  • can be implemented in incremental steps. (Burgstahler, 2007a-e)

For more information about UDE, consult The Center for Universal Design in Education at www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE.

What is a Community of Practice?

Photo of CBI participants talking at a round table while enjoying something to drink
 

CoPs are groups of people who share a common concern in their practice and interact regularly to improve their practice. CoPs identify problems, goals, and resources; assess change; and monitor and adjust plans and activities.

Team members in the AccessCollege project created CoPs on their own campuses and encouraged partner schools to do the same. Some meet in person; some meet online or by telephone; others meet in multiple ways. As with any CoP, each has chosen:

  1. a domain of interest that is related to the goals of AccessCollege (e.g., professional development of faculty, information technology policies and procedures, campus-wide efforts to promote universal design of courses and services);
  2. a group of people, including practitioners interested in furthering accessibility policy and practice within the CoP domain, sharing perspectives and expertise, identifying promoters and inhibitors of change, setting goals, and identifying projects; and
  3. practices undertaken to further goals identified by CoP members (Wenger, 1998).

CoPs host Capacity-Building Institutes, which draw in other members of on- and off-campus stakeholder groups to identify barriers for people with disabilities and strategies for promoting the universal design of courses and services on campus. Synthesis of input from CBIs further informs CoPs as members work toward campus improvements.

What is a Capacity-Building Institute?

Capacity-Building Institutes (CBI) bring people together to collaboratively identify solutions to specific problems. Participants may come from across disciplines, departments, and/or institutions. A CBI builds the capacity of each member of the group and their respective organizations to solve identified problem(s) and to explore ways that other individual or organizational stakeholders can contribute to solution(s).

The strength of a CBI is in the way people who may not typically work together converge to expand collective knowledge and develop strategies to address a common goal. Examples of goals that CBI participants can address are:

  • improving the overall accessibility of a postsecondary institution to people with disabilities
  • applying universal design of instruction campus-wide
  • assuring that information technology is accessible to all faculty, staff, and students

Conducting a CBI

This section shares suggestions for conducting a CBI on your campus.

What is the Purpose of CBIs Conducted by AccessCollege?

The overall goal of DO-IT's AccessCollege project is to ensure that students with disabilities receive a quality postsecondary education with the same opportunities for college and career success as those for students without disabilities. AccessCollege team members, representing a diverse set of twenty-two postsecondary schools, host CBIs on their campuses to identify, implement, and institutionalize policies, practices, and procedures that lead to more accessible courses and services.

AccessCollege and other DO-IT projects have hosted CBIs to solve problems related to accessibility and the application of universal design for many years. Topics of CBIs have included making:

A characteristic of the CBI style is to honor participants as the experts. For example, in panel presentations the panelists are typically CBI participants. This way, they share their knowledge as experts on a topic and continue to participate in follow-up activities as other participant experts share perspectives in other presentations. Typically, CBIs last from four hours to three days.

This guide outlines common ways to organize CBIs and shares sample agendas and visual aides that can help you shape a CBI on your campus. It also shares lessons learned from the AccessCollege team. It can be found online at www.washington.edu/doit/cbiN. This publication and its associated videos and handouts complement the following comprehensive resources for making instruction and student services, respectively, accessible to all students.

What Steps Do We Take to Conduct a CBI?

It is expected that every campus will have a unique approach, but here are some steps to consider in planning a CBI:

  1. Convene an existing Community of Practice or advisory group that focuses on disability issues or form a new group to plan the event. This type of group includes representation from key stakeholders and meets regularly to address campus accessibility issues.
  2. Select a theme or topic area for your CBI. Possible topics include the following:
    • Assuring that information technology (e.g., websites, computer labs, distance learning courses) are accessible to students, faculty, and staff with disabilities.
    • Making student service units (e.g., career centers, student activities) accessible to students with disabilities.
    • Increasing the skills of faculty to teach students with disabilities by teaching and implementing universal design strategies.
    • Working with representatives from a wide variety of stakeholder groups on campus to create institutional change toward a more welcoming and accessible campus.
  3. Identify handouts and videos to support the CBI (see the Resources section).
  4. Select speakers to present on specific topic areas related to access. Compile questions for small and large group discussions about issues, perspectives, and challenges related to the CBI topic.
  5. Make logistical arrangements: schedule rooms, create assignments for small groups, and appoint note takers.
  6. Invite members of key stakeholder groups to the event.
  7. Conduct the CBI. Consult the publication Equal Access: Universal Design of Conference Exhibits and Presentations at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Programs/equal_conf.html and employ universal design principles in your presentation(s). Plan that by the end of the CBI, participants will have a strategic plan and/or task list to incorporate the content learned at the CBI into their specific areas of responsibility.;
  8. Evaluate the CBI. Use our evaluation instrument, modify it, or develop your own.
  9. Disseminate information from your CBI. Publish proceedings and/or articles in journals or campus publications. Submit a press release to campus and local newspapers. This step will expand the impact of your work.

What are Some Tips for Delivering Presentations?

Photo of discussion between participants at a round table is aided by a sign language interpreter and laptop computer

In the publications noted earlier in these materials, DO-IT has provided tips for presentation delivery.

 

 

What Presentation and Handout Materials Can We Use for Our CBI?

Through AccessCollege and other projects, DO-IT has created a comprehensive collection of publications and videos that can be used in your CBI. They can be found online by selecting "publications and videos" from the DO-IT website at www.washington.edu/doit. Any CBI might include the handouts listed below:

Listed below are additional publications, videos, web resources, and overhead visuals for specific CBI topics.

Creating a More Accessible Institution

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Video

Handout

Websites

Making Instruction Welcoming and Accessible to All Students

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Websites

Overhead Visuals

Making Online Learning Accessible to All Students and Instructors

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Website

Overhead Visuals

Making Student Services Welcoming and Accessible to All Students

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Websites

Overhead Visuals

Assuring that Information Technology is Accessible to All Students

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Websites

Overhead Visuals

Making Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Accessible to All Students

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Websites

Overhead Visuals

Assuring that Employment Opportunities and Services are Accessible to Students with Disabilities

Consider using the following additional products for a CBI on this topic.

Videos

Handouts

Website

Overhead Visuals

What Should We Include in the Invitation to a CBI?

In addition to the schedule and location, emphasize the relevance of the topic, the need for representation from diverse groups, the interactive nature of the program, and expected outcomes. On the following page is a CBI sample letter of invitation.


Photo of CBI participants talking while sitting at a large conference table
 

Dear [Name],

You are invited to participate in a Capacity-Building Institute (CBI), to be held at [institution] on [date] from [start time] to [end time]. Please register for this meeting at [URL].

The CBI has been organized as a result of recent conversations at the [institution], where faculty, staff, and administrators have discussed ways in which universal design (UD) can create welcoming and inclusive learning environments for all students. Given the rapid pace at which the application of universal design is evolving in higher education, the [university/college] has become increasingly aware of the professional development needs of faculty and staff to apply UD principles within and outside of the classroom.

The goals of the CBI are to engage faculty, staff, and administrators in a discussion that will ultimately lead to improved accessibility of courses and services that takes into consideration the diverse learning styles, abilities, and disabilities of today's students.

The CBI will have three guest speakers presenting on specific topic areas related to UD. The Institute will also include a brainstorming session in which issues, perspectives, and challenges related to UD will be actively explored. All participants will leave with a strategic plan for incorporating universal design into their specific disciplines.

The CBI will include information on relevant legislation, principles of universal design, specific ways to create inclusive classrooms and services, information on local resources, and the development of a personal or departmental action plan to apply practical universal design strategies to transform curricula or services.

Thank you for your interest in creating inclusive communities for all students at [Institution].

Sincerely,
[Institutional Representative]

What is an Example of an Agenda for a Half-Day CBI?

Following is an agenda and timeline for a four-hour CBI on universal design of instruction. Videos referred to in the sample agenda are available in the Resources section. Most videos and publications are also available online at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures. At the end of the agenda are suggestions for extending its length to a full day and/or changing the focus to universal design of student services or systemic change of an entire campus.


Half-Day Agenda

8:00 - 8:25 a.m.
Check In & Refreshments 

8:30 - 9:00 a.m. 
Welcome/Introductions 
Distribute CBI agenda and the following handouts (available at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures)

  • AccessCollege: An Alliance to Promote the Success of People with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education
  • AccessCollege: Systemic Change for Postsecondary Institutions
  • Universal Design in Education: Principles and Applications
  • Universal Design of Instruction: Definition, Principles, and Examples
  • Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction
  • DO-IT Free Printed Publications
  • DO-IT Videos and Training Materials

9:00 - 9:10 a.m. 
Typical Accommodations 
Emphasize that a disability services office typically provides accommodations and describe your institution's process. Introduce the video, which focuses on accommodations for students with disabilities.

9:10 - 9:30 a.m. 
Video View 
Building the Team: Faculty, Staff, and Students Working Together (found at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/team.html) After the video, answer questions. Describe how universal design (UD) complements the accommodation model by encouraging faculty to be proactive and to plan ahead in making their courses accessible to students with disabilities. Refer to the UD handouts and use some of the overhead visuals provided in the Resources section.
Tell participants that the next video, also developed through a nationwide collaboration, gives information on the process and specific examples of universal design applied to instruction.

10:00 - 10:15 a.m.
Video View
Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction (found at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/ea_udi.html) Respond to questions. End by emphasizing the need for both UD and accommodations to maximize the success of all students and to reduce the impact of having students with disabilities in your classes (by planning ahead).

10:15 - 10:30 a.m.
Break
Emphasize that UD increases access and reduces, but does not eliminate, the need for accommodations. Tell participants to, after the break, meet in small, preassigned groups (perhaps defined by the table where they are sitting) to make a list of specific things instructors can do to make their courses more accessible to all students, including those with disabilities. Each group needs to select a discussion leader, recorder, and reporter that participants can choose. Distribute poster paper and felt pens to each group.

10:30 - 11:00 a.m
Discussion in Small Groups 
What can instructors do to make their courses more accessible to all students, including those with disabilities?

11:00 - 11:20 a.m.
Small Groups Report to Large Group
Post lists so that everyone can see them.

11:20 - 11:35 a.m.
Break 
Tell participants to, after the break, reconvene in their small groups. Together they will make a list of specific things the institution can do to help faculty make their courses more accessible to all students, including those with disabilities.

11:35 - 12:05 p.m.
Discussion in Small Groups 
What can institutions do to help faculty make their courses more accessible to all students, including those with disabilities?

12:05 - 12:20 p.m.
Small Groups Report to Large Group.
Post lists so that everyone can see them.

12:20 - 12:30 p.m. 
Conclusion and Evaluation 
Refer participants to The Faculty Room (www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty) and campus resources. 

Distribute the form Post-Evaluation of Professional Development (found on pp. 31-32). Ask the participants to fill out the form and return to the facilitator.

Thank participants for coming and tell them the lists of suggestions will be combined into proceedings and mailed (email or postal) to a designated location.


This CBI outline can be extended to a full day or longer by adding one or more of the following activities:

  • A student panel where students with different types of disabilities talk about their accommodations, good/bad experiences with instructors, and what works for them
  • A presentation and discussion on accessible web design or some other special topic
  • A demonstration of assistive technology for people with disabilities
  • A faculty member shares his/her implementation of universal design
  • A discussion on how topics of accessibility and universal design could be incorporated into a course (e.g. in an engineering class, students could be required to address accessibility issues in a design project)

This CBI can be modified to address systemic change for the entire institution (DO-IT, 2007) or for specific areas such as the student service organizations (e.g., career centers, admissions offices) or information technology by using appropriate videos, handouts, websites, and overhead visuals.

What are Examples of Agendas for Full-Day CBIs?

Following is an agenda of a full-day Capacity-Building Institute (CBI) that is similar to one conducted at Florida State University (FSU). Its purpose was to improve the accessibility of campus websites.


Photo of DO-IT Staff member Scott Bellman looking at a laptop computer screen with a DO-IT Scholar in classroom.
 

Full-Day Agenda (Sample #1)

Morning: Overview of Accessibility of Online Resources

8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Check In & Refreshments

8:30 - 8:45 a.m.
Welcome Message
President
Vice President for Student Affairs

Distribute the evaluation form Pre- and Post-Test for Professional Development (found on pp. 29-30) to participants and ask them to fill out the Pre-Test (front side of the form).

Distribute CBI Agenda and the following handouts (found at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures)

  • AccessCollege: An Alliance to Promote the Success of People with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education
  • AccessCollege: Systemic Change for Postsecondary Institutions
  • Universal Design in Education: Principles and Applications
  • Universal Design: Principles, Process, and Applications
  • Working Together: People with Disabilities and Computer Technology
  • World Wide Access: Accessible
  • Web Design Web Accessibility: Guidelines for Administrators
  • DO-IT Free Printed Publications
  • DO-IT Videos, Books, and Training Materials

8:45 - 9:30 a.m.
Overview of Universal Design of Online Instruction
Participants explore the big picture of accessible online teaching and learning:

  • How are students with disabilities affected by inaccessible course content?
  • What makes technologies accessible? What does universal design mean?
  • What are the legal requirements?
  • How is online access achieved for students who are blind and visually impaired, are deaf or hard of hearing, have mobility impairments, have reading disorders (e.g., dyslexia), and/or have attention deficits?
  • What standards, guidelines, and resources are available to assist in ensuring that instructional content is delivered in a way that is accessible to all students?

9:30 - 10:30 a.m.
Online Accessibility Nuts and Bolts
In an interactive session, participants are led through a mock Blackboard™ course, which features a variety of accessibility problems and solutions. How do you assure that all students have access to Blackboard, your website, Adobe® PDF files, Microsoft® Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, and other resources?

10:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Break

10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
Web Accessibility @ FSU
Discussion moderated by staff from FSU, College of Information and Assessment Services
FSU faculty, staff, and administrators brainstorm the current state of accessibility of instructional technology at FSU and identify next steps for moving forward. Suggestions are recorded on a flip chart.

  • Where are we now?
  • Where do we want to be?
  • How can we get there?

12:00 - 1:10 p.m.
Lunch and Student Panel
Real students with real issues share what it is like to be a person with a disability attending a major university and using online content. Participants ask questions.
Afternoon: Steps Toward Web Accessibility

Afternoon: Steps Toward Web Accessibility

1:10 - 3:15 p.m. (with one break)
Web Accessibility Techniques
Participants further explore common web accessibility problems and solutions. They learn the state of accessibility on a variety of technologies and file formats used in delivering web content, including PDF, Flash®, multimedia, PowerPoint, Blackboard, Java™, and AJAX. Resources are provided with more detailed information including the DO-IT Knowledge Base, which is linked from the DO-IT website at www.washington.edu/doit at "Search DO-IT Knowledge Base."

3:15 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 4:15 p.m.
Discuss the Accessibility of FSU Websites
After a brief introduction to available FSU web accessibility evaluation tools and resources, participants discuss the accessibility of specific FSU websites in one or multiple groups. Those with promising designs demonstrate their approaches to accessibility, and participants brainstorm possible solutions to accessibility problems.

4:15 - 4:30 p.m.
Conclusion and Evaluation
Summarize content and results of CBI. Participants complete the Post-Test for Professional Development, which was distributed at the beginning of the CBI, and return to a designated location.


Following is the agenda of a full-day CBI that is similar to one conducted by the University of Washington. Its purpose was to help teachers fully include students with disabilities in their science courses by applying universal design and providing accommodations.


Full-Day Agenda (Sample #2)

8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Registration, Continental Breakfast

9:00 - 10:45 a.m.
Introductions Distribute the evaluation form Pre- and Post-Test for Professional Development (found on pp. 29-30) to participants and ask them to fill out the Pre-Test (front side of the form).

Distribute CBI agenda and handouts (located at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures)

  • Making Math, Science, and Technology Instruction Accessible to Students with Disabilities—A RESOURCE FOR TEACHERS AND TEACHER EDUCATORS (which includes most handouts and videos referenced in the agenda)
  • DO-IT Free Printed Publications
  • DO-IT Videos, Books, and Training Materials

View Video
Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities (on DVD or at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/wt_sci.html).

Presentation
Access Barriers, Access Solutions—Accommodations and Universal Design.

View Video
The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science (on DVD or at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/winequ.html).

Activity
Complete a Student Abilities Profile (at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Programs/accommodation.html#sap)

10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
Activity
Discover accommodation and universal design strategies for a hands-on science activity.

View Video
Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction (on DVD or at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Video/ea_udi.html).

Presentation 
Making Science Labs Accessible to All Students.

12:00 - 12:45 p.m.
Lunch

12:45 - 2:15 p.m.
Discuss
What can individual stakeholders (e.g., a student, teacher, parent) do to increase the success of students with disabilities in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)? Consider both accommodations and universal design approaches.

Activity
Create a personal plan for implementation of universal design of your instruction. Distribute a copy of the publication Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction (located at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html), cross out items that do not apply; insert implementation dates for others.

Report
What steps will you take to make your courses more accessible?

2:15 - 3:30 p.m.
View Video
Computer Access: In Our Own Words (on DVD or at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/comp_acc.html) Note that additional technology videos in handouts focus on specific disabilities related to learning, mobility, and vision.

Presentation
Overview of Technology Access Barriers and Solutions—Assistive Technology and Universal Design.

Discuss
What can institutional stakeholders (e.g., schools, districts, state agencies) do to increase the success of students with disabilities in STEM? What systemic change efforts would you recommend? Consider both policies and practices.

3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Conclusion and Evaluation
What did you learn and how will you apply it?
Ask participants to fill out the Post-Test for Professional Development, which was distributed at the beginning of the CBI, and return to a designated location.

What is an Example of a Multiple-Day CBI?

Below is an agenda for a multi-day CBI that is similar to one conducted by the University of Washington. Participants in a wide variety of positions developed solutions for the under-representation of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Most participants were administrators or support staff for projects that serve to increase the successful participation of women, minorities, and people with disabilities in STEM.


Photo of DO-IT Staff member and guest smile for a picture in an office

Multi-Day Agenda

Tuesday

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Evening Social

Wednesday

8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
Buffet Breakfast & Networking

9:00 - 9:50 a.m.
Welcome
Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler, DO-IT Director, University of Washington

Distribute the evaluation form Pre- and Post-Test for Professional Development to participants and ask them to fill out the Pre-Test (front side of the form).

Distribute CBI Agenda and the following handouts (available at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures)

  • Making Math, Science, and Technology Instruction Accessible to Students with Disabilities-A RESOURCE FOR TEACHERS AND TEACHER EDUCATORS (which includes most handouts and videos referenced in the agenda)
  • DO-IT Free Printed Publications
  • DO-IT Videos, Books, and Training Materials

Introductions

Students with disabilities share STEM access perspectives in video
Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities (on DVD or at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/wt_sci.html)

9:50 - 10:30 a.m.
Pursuit of a STEM Career: A Personal Story
Dr. Imke Durre, Scientist, National Climatic Data Center

10:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Break

10:45 - 11:15 a.m.
Broadening Participation in STEM
Dr. Mark Leddy, National Science Foundation

11:15 - 11:55 a.m.
Access Barriers, Solutions—Accommodations and Universal Design

Teachers and students share ideas for assuring access to STEM courses for students with disabilities in video
The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science (Video and handouts available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/winequ.html)

11:55 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Introduction to Small Group Discussion Format

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch and Working Group Discussions
Question: How are STEM access issues for people with disabilities the same as those for other underrepresented groups (e.g., racial/ethnic minorities, women)? How are they different?

1:30 - 1:50 p.m.
Working Group Reports
Each group shares one way STEM access issues for people with disabilities are (1) the same as and (2) different from those for other underrepresented groups (e.g., racial/ethnic minorities, women).

1:50 - 2:45 p.m.
Activity: Discover Accommodation and Universal Design Strategies for a Hands-On Science Activity
Valerie Sundby, Lyla Crawford, Project Coordinators, AccessSTEM

Educators share universal instructional design strategies in video
Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction (Video and handouts available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/ea_udi.html)

2:45 - 3:00 p.m.
Break

3:00 - 3:50 p.m.
Critical Junctures Panel
Projects to increase participation of people with disabilities in STEM share experiences and insights.

3:50 - 4:30 p.m.
Working Group Discussions
Question: In what ways do making STEM activities accessible to students with disabilities benefit other students?

4:30 - 4:50 p.m.
Working Group Reports
Each group shares one way making STEM activities accessible to students with disabilities benefits other students.

4:50 - 5:00 p.m.
Preview of Tonight's Activity and Tomorrow's Agenda, Daily Feedback

5:00 p.m.
Adjourn

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Dinner, Networking, and Discussion of Future Collaborations

Thursday

8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
Buffet Breakfast, Networking

9:00 - 10:25 a.m
Panel
Projects that increase the participation of underrepresented minorities and women in STEM share lessons learned in broadening participation in STEM. How can those lessons be applied to increase the participation of people with disabilities in STEM?

10:25 - 10:40 a.m.
Break

10:40 - 12:00 p.m.
Students with disabilities share transition strategies in video
Taking Charge II: Two Stories of Success and Self-Determination (Video and handout available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/charge_2.html)

Panel
People with disabilities who are also racial/ethnic minorities or women share their stories. With what communities do they identify? What promotes and what inhibits the pursuit of STEM courses and careers?

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch and Working Group Discussions
Question: What can STEM projects do to increase the participation of students with disabilities?

1:30 - 1:50 p.m.
Working Group Reports
Each group shares two things STEM projects can do to increase the participation of people who have disabilities.

1:50 - 2:30 p.m.
Information Technology Access Barriers and Solutions: Assistive Technology and Universal Design Students demonstrate assistive technology in video
Computer Access: In Our Own Words (Video and handout available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/comp_acc.html)

Accessible Web Design
Terry Thompson, Technology Specialist, AccessSTEM

How to make web pages accessible to people with disabilities is demonstrated in the video
World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design (video and handouts available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/www.html)

2:30 - 3:05 p.m.
Science Lab Access Barriers and Solutions: Accommodations and Universal Design
Dr. Samantha Langley-Turnbaugh, Associate Professor and Chair Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of Southern Maine.

Distribute brochure
Making Science Labs Accessible to Students with Disabilities (located at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/science_lab.html)

3:05 - 3:15 p.m.
STEM students with sensory impairments and educators share experiences in video
Equal Access: Science and Students with Sensory Impairments (video and handout available at www.washington.edu/doit/Video/ea_sci_sensory.html)

3:15 - 4:00 p.m.
Break

4:00 - 4:55 p.m.
Discussion
Question: How can projects best measure the outcomes and impacts of their interventions to increase the participation of underrepresented minorities, women, and people with disabilities in STEM?

4:55 - 5:00 p.m.
Preview of Tomorrow's Agenda, Daily Feedback

Dinner on Your Own

Friday

8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
Buffet Breakfast, Networking, Discussion

9:00 - 10:15 a.m.
Making Your Project Accessible to Participants with Disabilities: A Checklist Distribute a copy of the brochure
Equal Access: Universal Design of Your Project (located at: www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Programs/design.html)
Begin a personal plan for implementation: In your copy of the brochure, cross out items that do not apply and write an implementation date for others.

Discussion
Question: How can the checklist be adapted for use in NSF STEM projects?

10:15 - 10:30 a.m.
Break

10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
Conclusion
What can we do as a group to promote access to STEM for people with disabilities?

  • Proceedings
  • Publication/checklist
  • Review of Disability Studies, other journals
  • Presentation/poster/publication at NSF's Joint Annual Meeting (JAM), other meetings

Visit the AccessSTEM website, including a Knowledge Base of Q&As, case studies, and promising practices, at www.washington.edu/doit/Stem

11:45 a.m.
Evaluation

Box lunch and further discussion.

Participants asked to fill out the Post-Test for Professional Development (back side of form found on pp. 29-30), which was distributed at the beginning of the CBI, and return to a designated location.

Have a safe trip home!

How Can We Evaluate Our CBI?

Young man in a wheelchair using a keyboard

The AccessCollege team has developed two evaluation instruments that you might consider using for your CBI.

  • The first one, titled Pre- and Post-Test for Professional Development, can be printed as a two-sided handout. Ask participants to fill in the front side at the beginning of the CBI and the back side at the end.
  • The second one, Evaluation of Professional Development, is a shorter, post-only evaluation instrument that is particularly suitable for short CBIs.

 

Post-Evaluation of Professional Development

Post-Evaluation of Professional Development

Please complete this survey to evaluate the professional development training you are participating in. Return the survey to the envelope provided by the facilitator. Your responses will be used for research purposes to help us determine the value of this professional development and create training materials. The survey will take about five minutes. Participation is voluntary and anonymous and you may choose not to answer every question. Thank you for your feedback.

Current position:
 [ ] Faculty [ ] Administrator [ ] Support Staff
 [ ] K-12 teacher [ ] Employer [ ] Other: ______________
Gender: [ ] Female [ ] Male
Number of years, if any, of teaching experience: ___________________________________

Have you ever had a student with a disability in your class, program, or service?

Yes     No     Unsure

Do you have any colleagues, friends, or family members with disabilities?

Yes     No     Unsure

Do you have a disability?

Yes     No     Unsure

Check the box to indicate your level of confidence that in your class, program, or service area you are now able to:

Very Confident    Not at all Confident

Apply universal design principles and strategies.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Use technology in a way that supports students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Refer students with disabilities to appropriate campus resources.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Meet legal obligations to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Make your course/service/program accessible to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Will you implement elements of what you learned? [ ] Yes [ ] No
If yes, what will you implement?

  • Include a statement in my syllabus/program brochure/website that indicates how to obtain disability-related accommodations.
  • Use multi-modal presentations.
  • Arrange the physical space I use to be more easily accessed by everyone.
  • Ensure that all materials used in my class/program are available in alternate formats.
  • Be prepared to respond to requests for accommodations.
  • Ensure that commercial media I use (e.g., DVDs) are captioned.
  • Create simple directions for assignments and forms and otherwise make them easier to complete.
  • Regularly assess the accessibility of my course, service, or program.
  • Other (Please describe):

Please describe the strengths and/or weaknesses of this professional development.

Suggest additional programs and materials that would be helpful for faculty and/or staff related to working with students with disabilities.


Pre- and Post-Test for Professional Development

Pre-Test

Please complete this survey to assess your knowledge pre- and post- the professional development training you are participating in. Please complete this side of the survey, the Pre-Test, before this program starts. Complete the other side of this page, the Post-Test, at the end of the program. Return the survey to the envelope provided by the facilitator. Your responses will be used for research purposes to help us determine the value of this professional development and create training materials. Each part of the survey will take about five minutes. Participation is voluntary and anonymous and you may choose not to answer every question. Thank you for your feedback.

Current position:
 [ ] Faculty [ ] Administrator [ ] Support Staff
 [ ] K-12 teacher [ ] Employer [ ] Other: ______________
Gender: [ ] Female [ ] Male
Number of years, if any, of teaching experience: ___________________________________

Have you ever had a student with a disability in your class, program, or service?

Yes     No     Unsure

Do you have any colleagues, friends, or family members with disabilities?

Yes     No     Unsure

Do you have a disability?

Yes     No     Unsure

Check the box to indicate your level of confidence that in your class, program, or service area you are (before training) able to:

Very Confident    Not at all Confident

Apply universal design principles and strategies.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Use technology in a way that supports students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Refer students with disabilities to appropriate campus resources.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Meet legal obligations to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Make your course/service/program accessible to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

What do you hope to learn in this program?

Post-Test

Check the box to indicate your level of confidence that in your class, program, or service area you are now able to:

Very Confident    Not at all Confident

Apply universal design principles and strategies.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Use technology in a way that supports students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Refer students with disabilities to appropriate campus resources.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Meet legal obligations to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Make your course/service/program accessible to students with disabilities.

[ ]           [ ]           [ ]           [ ]

Will you implement elements of what you learned? [ ] Yes [ ] No
If yes, what will you implement?

  • Include a statement in my syllabus/program brochure/website that indicates how to obtain disability-related accommodations.
  • Use multi-modal presentations.
  • Arrange the physical space I use to be more easily accessed by everyone.
  • Ensure that all materials used in my class/program are available in alternate formats.
  • Be prepared to respond to requests for accommodations.
  • Ensure that commercial media I use (e.g., DVDs) are captioned.
  • Create simple directions for assignments and forms and otherwise make them easier to complete.
  • Regularly assess the accessibility of my course, service, or program.
  • Other (please describe):

Please describe the strengths and/or weaknesses of this professional development.

Suggest additional programs and materials that would be helpful for faculty and/or staff related to working with students with disabilities.

What Can We Do After the CBI to Maximize Its Impact?

Develop proceedings to share with CBI participants, other members of stakeholder groups, and campus decision-makers. Examples of proceedings can be found at www.washington.edu/doit/cbi.

Submit articles based on the proceedings to a professional journal. An example can be viewed in a special issue of the Journal of Special Education, Volume 18, Number 4, 2003, at jst.sagepub.com/content/18/4.toc.

Write a press release for campus and local newspapers. This effort can disseminate findings to stakeholders and build enthusiasm for future CBIs.

Associate your CBI with a committee that meets on an ongoing basis. For example, at the University of Washington, the Advisory Committee on Disability Issues sponsored a CBI and then used the proceedings to help set its agenda for future efforts and to support its recommendations.

If you are developing a new group, consider using a Community of Practice (CoP) structure. A CoP is a group of people who share a common concern and interact regularly to improve their practice. CoPs identify problems, goals, and resources; assess measurable change; and monitor and adjust plans and activities.

Where Can We Get More Presentation Ideas and Materials?

Image of Scholar in a wheelchair uses assistive technology to control her computer mouse using her chin.

DO-IT has a large collection of curriculum materials, short handouts, and videos that can useful to you in developing your CBI. The following sets of comprehensive training materials are of particular relevance to faculty and student service personnel on a postsecondary campus.

In addition, the following websites provide comprehensive resources for presenters and participants.

  • The Faculty Room (www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty). A place for postsecondary faculty and administrators to learn about how to create classroom environments and activities that maximize the learning of all students, including those with disabilities-includes legal issues, universal design principles, and accommodation strategies.
     
  • The Student Services Conference Room (www.washington.edu/doit/Conf). A place for staff in postsecondary libraries, admissions/financial aid, and registration offices; computer labs; and other campus services-includes a searchable database of frequently asked questions, promising practices, and tips on how to create accessible student service organizations.
     
  • The Board Room (www.washington.edu/doit/Board). Provides guidance to postsecondary administrators regarding policies and practices that maximize the learning and participation of all students, including those with disabilities.
     
  • The Student Lounge (www.washington.edu/doit/Student). Helps students with disabilities prepare for and succeed in postsecondary studies.
     
  • The Center for Universal Design in Education (www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE). Shares the definitions, principles, guidelines, and strategies for applying universal design to instruction, student services, information technology, and physical spaces.

Resources

Photo of DO-IT director Sheryl Burgstahler gives direction while two DO-IT Scholars look at a computer screen

This Resources section contains references to publications and web resources cited in the text of these materials, templates for overhead materials that can be used in presentations, training videos in DVD format, and a sample of photocopy-ready handouts for presentations.

 

 

 

References

Publications

The following publications are referenced in these materials.

Blackorby, J., & Wagner, M. (1996). Longitudinal post school outcomes of youth with disabilities: Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study. Exceptional Children, 62, 399-413.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2002). Building the team: Faculty, staff, and students working together. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/TeamN.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2005). Students with disabilities and campus services: Building the team. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/AdminN.

Burgstahler, S. (2007a). Applications of Universal Design in Education (UDE). Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007. www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/app_ud_edu.html.

Burgstahler, S. (2007b). Equal Access: Universal Design of Instruction. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html.

Burgstahler, S. (2007c). Equal Access: Universal Design of Student Services. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_ss.html.

Burgstahler, S. (2007d). Universal Design in Education: Principles and Applications. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/ud_edu.html.

Burgstahler, S. (2007e). Universal Design of Instruction: Definition, Principles, and Examples. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/instruction.html.

DO-IT. (2007). AccessCollege: Systemic Change for Postsecondary Institutions. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved August 1, 2007, from www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html.

Levin, J. S. (1998). Sense-making in the community college: The meanings of organizational change. (Clearinghouse No. JC980173). Arizona. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED417777).

Levy, A., & Merry, U. (1986). Organizational transformation: Approaches, strategies, theories. New York: Praeger.

National Council on Disability and Social Security Administration. (2000). Transition and post-school outcomes for youth with disabilities: Closing the gaps to post-secondary education and employment. Washington, DC: Author.

National Organization on Disability. (2004). Harris 2004 survey of Americans with disabilities. Washington, DC: Author.

Oliver, M., & Barnes, C. (1998). Disabled people and social policy. London: Longman.

Wagner, M., Newman, L., Cameto, R., & Levine, P. (2005). Changes over time in the early postschool outcomes of youth with disabilities. A report of findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

DO-IT Comprehensive Training Materials

The following materials can be purchased from DO-IT or freely viewed online.

Building the Team: Faculty, Staff, and Students Working Together—PRESENTATION AND RESOURCE MATERIALS.
Comprehensive materials that include a synthesis of research, institutionalization guidelines, presentation tips, tailored presentations, overhead visuals, and handouts help faculty and administrators at postsecondary institutions fully include students with disabilities in courses. www.washington.edu/doit/TeamN

Students with Disabilities and Campus Services: Building the Team—PRESENTATION AND RESOURCE MATERIALS.
Comprehensive materials that include a synthesis of research, institutionalization guidelines, presentation tips, tailored presentations, overhead visuals, and handouts to help student service staff and administrators make their campus services more accessible to students with disabilities. www.washington.edu/doit/AdminN

Making Math, Science, and Technology Instruction Accessible to Students with Disabilities—A RESOURCE FOR TEACHERS AND TEACHER EDUCATORS.
Comprehensive materials and resources help science, math, and technology teachers fully include students with disabilities in their classes and labs. www.washington.edu/doit/MathSci

DO-IT Websites

The following websites provide training and resources for postsecondary faculty, administrators, and students. They can be accessed by selecting; AccessCollege from the DO-IT website at washington.edu/doit or by using the uniform resource locations indicated below.

The Faculty Room
www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty
The Faculty Room is a place for postsecondary faculty and administrators to learn about how to create classroom environments, e-learning, and other activities that maximize the learning of all students, including those with disabilities.

The Student Services Conference Room
www.washington.edu/doit/Conf
The Conference Room is a place for staff in postsecondary libraries; career services, admissions, financial aid, and registration offices; computer labs; and other campus services.

The Board Room
www.washington.edu/doit/Board
The Board Room provides guidance to postsecondary administrators regarding policies and practices that maximize the learning and participation of all students, including those with disabilities.

The Student Lounge
www.washington.edu/doit/Student
The Student Lounge helps students with disabilities prepare for and succeed in postsecondary studies.

The Center for Universal Design in Education
www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE
The Center for Universal Design in Education shares the definitions, principles, guidelines, and strategies for applying universal design to instruction, student services, information technology, and physical spaces.

Overhead Visuals

Following are examples of templates that can be used in creating overhead visuals for a Capacity-Building Institute (CBI). Many more options can be found in the following publications:

Visual #1

Universal Design in Education: From Principles to Practice

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/ud_edu.html

Visual #2

Universal Design of Learning
Universal Design of Instruction
Universal Design of Technology
Universal Design of Facilities
Universal Design of Student Services

Visual #3

Key Resources

Select "AccessCollege" from the DO-IT website at
www.washington.edu/doit

for

  • The Faculty Room
  • The Conference Room
  • The Board Room
  • The Student Lounge
  • The Center for Universal Design in Education

Visual #4

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

"No otherwise qualified individual with a disability shall, solely by reason of his/her disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity of a public entity."

Visual #5

"Otherwise qualified"

meets the academic and technical standards requisite to admission or participation

with or without

  • reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or practices
  • removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers
  • provision of auxiliary aids and services.

Visual #6

"Person with a disability"

is any person who:

  • has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities including walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working
  • has a record of such an impairment
  • is regarded as having such an impairment

Visual #7

Examples of Disabilities

  • Low Vision
  • Blindness
  • Hearing Impairments
  • Mobility Impairments
  • Mental Health/Psychiatric Impairments
  • Health Impairments
  • Learning Disabilities

 

Visual #8

Access Challenges

  • Physical Differences
  • Sensory Differences
  • Cognitive/Learning Differences
  • Attention Differences
  • Communication Differences
  • Differences in Socioeconomic Status, Race, Culture, Gender

 

Visual #9

Approaches to Access:

  • Accommodations (reactive)
  • Universal Design (proactive)

Visual #10

Accommodations

Alternate formats, services, adjustments, & technology for specific students

Visual #11

Universal Design =

"The design of products and environments to be usable by all people, without the need for adaptation or specialized design."
 

Center for Universal Design, North Carolina State University

Visual #12

Diversity in Postsecondary Institutions

  • Ethnic/Racial Minorities
  • English as a Second Language
  • Different Learning Styles
  • People with Disabilities
  • Age, Gender Differences

Visual #13

Principles of Universal Design

  • Equitable Use
  • Flexibility in Use
  • Simple and Intuitive Use
  • Perceptible Information
  • Tolerance for Error
  • Low Physical Effort
  • Size and Shape for Approach and Use

Visual #14

UD is not:

  • just beneficial to people with disabilities
  • about lowering standards
  • about one-size-fits-all
  • UD can be applied incrementally

Visual #15

UD Products/Environments:

  • are flexible enough to be directly used (without assistive technologies, modifications) by people with a wide range of abilities and circumstances
  • are compatible with assistive technologies and other accommodations for those who cannot efficiently access/use the products/environments directly

Visual #16

UD Steps

  1. Identify application.
  2. Define universe.
  3. Involve consumers.
  4. Adopt guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  5. Apply UD guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  6. Plan for accommodations.
  7. Train & support.
  8. Evaluate.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Programs/ud.html

Visual #17

Universal Design in Education (UDE) can be applied to:

  • Instruction
  • Student Services
  • Information Technology
  • Physical Spaces

Visual #18

UD of IT

  • Computers
  • Software
  • Websites
  • Videos
  • Office Equipment
  • ...

Visual #19

UD of Computer Labs

  • Planning, Policies, and Evaluation
  • Facility and Environment
  • Lab Staff
  • Information Resources
  • Computer, Software, and Assistive Technology

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Technology/comp.access.html

Visual #20

Problem → Solution

Access to computers → Assistive technology (AT)
Access to electronic design → Universal resources

Visual #21

UD Video/Multimedia Presentation:

  • is videotaped with captions in mind
  • has large, clear captions
  • is designed so that key content is spoken as well as demonstrated visually
  • has audio-described version available

Visual #22

UD of Instruction Steps

  1. Identify course.
  2. Define universe.
  3. Select instructional strategies for good practice.
  4. Adopt guidelines/performance indicators.
  5. Apply UD guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  6. Plan for accommodations.
  7. Evaluate.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html

Visual #23

UD of Instruction

  • Class Climate
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Delivery Methods
  • Information Resources/Technology
  • Interaction
  • Feedback
  • Assessment
  • Accommodation

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html

Visual #24

UDI Examples

  • Put a statement on your syllabus inviting students to meet with you to discuss disability-related accommodations and other learning needs.
  • Use multiple modes to deliver content (e.g., lecture, discussion, hands-on activities, Internet-based interaction, and fieldwork).
  • Provide class outlines and notes on an accessible website.
  • Face the class and speak clearly.
  • Use captioned videos.
  • Assess student learning using multiple methods.

Visual #25

UD of Curriculum

provides multiple means of:

  • Representation
  • Expression
  • Engagement

Visual #26

UD of Student Services

  • Planning, Policies, & Evaluation
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Staff Information Resources/Technology
  • Events

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_ss.html

Visual #27

UD of instruction, curriculum, student services, technology, physical spaces
minimizes
the need for assistive technology & other accommodations.

Visual #28

There is a need for both:

  • Universal Design (proactive)
  • Accommodations (reactive)

Visual #29

A Fully Accessible Postsecondary Institution

Visual #30

Assure access to:

  • physical spaces
  • computers
  • information resources (e.g., publications, videos, websites)
  • events
  • on-site learning
  • distance learning
  • student services

Visual #31

Address issues related to:

  • procurement
  • development
  • use

and

  • policies
  • procedures
  • training/support

Visual #32

UD Impact on Roles

Diagram of relationship between students with disabilities, disability services and facaulty and staff

Visual #33

Campus Accessibility Indicators

1. Institution-level mission, vision, and values statements are inclusive of all people, including those with disabilities.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #34

Campus Accessibility Indicators

2. Disability is included in campus discussions of and training on diversity and special populations.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

 

Visual #35

Campus Accessibility Indicators

3. Policies, procedures, and practices are regularly reviewed for barrier removal and inclusivity of people with a diverse range of characteristics, including disability.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #35

Campus Accessibility Indicators

3. Policies, procedures, and practices are regularly reviewed for barrier removal and inclusivity of people with a diverse range of characteristics, including disability.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #36

Campus Accessibility Indicators

4. Administrators, staff, faculty, and student leaders are trained and empowered to take action around disability and universal design issues.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #37

Campus Accessibility Indicators

5. People with disabilities are visible (even if their disabilities are not) on campus including in positions of power and authority (e.g., administrators, faculty, student leaders).
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #38

Campus Accessibility Indicators

6. Budgeting reflects the reality of the cost of applying universal design and of accommodating current and prospective employees, students, and visitors with disabilities.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #39

Campus Accessibility Indicators

7. Measures of student success (e.g., retention, course completion, graduation) are the same for all student populations, including students with disabilities, and institutional research includes this data.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #40

Campus Accessibility Indicators

8. Campus publications, websites, marketing, and public relations include images and content related to disabilities.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #41

Campus Accessibility Indicators

9. Campus publications and websites, including web-based courses, meet established accessibility standards.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #42

Campus Accessibility Indicators

10. Disability issues are regularly included as a component of the curriculum.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #43

Campus Accessibility Indicators

11. All campus facilities and other spaces are physically accessible.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #44

Visual #45

The Student Services Conference Room

www.washington.edu/doit/Conf

DO-IT Student Services Conference Room screenshot
 

Visual #46

Visual #47

The Center for UD in Education

www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE

DO-IT Center for Universal Design in Education screenshot
 

Videos and Publications

Videos and publications that can be used in a CBI are included in this binder. A larger collection is available at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures.

Videos

The following videos, which are included on DVDs in this binder, were created by DO-IT to promote the academic and career success of people with disabilities and the use of technology as an empowering tool. Most are freely available to view online at www.washington.edu/doit/Video. Downloadable versions to play from your computer may be obtained without charge by sending a request to doit@u.washington.edu.

Useful handouts that summarize the content and point to related resources for each presentation can be found on the DO-IT website. All videos are open-captioned for those with hearing impairments and audio-described versions are provided for those who are blind. Permission is granted to reproduce DO-IT videos and publications for educational, noncommercial purposes as long as the source is acknowledged.

Instruction and Student Services

Careers

Information Technology

DO-IT Programs and Overview

Publications

DO-IT maintains a large collection of publications that promote the academic and career success of people with disabilities and the use of technology as an empowering tool. All titles are available at www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/publist.html. Listed below are those most relevant to the content of this notebook.

Instruction

Student Services

Careers

Information Technology

Overview and Resources

Building Capacity for a Welcoming and Accessible Postsecondary Institution - PDFs

To print a complete copy of the training materials, access and print each section linked below.

About the Contributors

pages i-vii, includes

  • Acknowledgments
  • Table of Contents

Introduction to Capacity Building

pages 1-4

Conducting a CBI

pages 5-34

Resources

pages 35-90, includes:

  • References
  • Overhead Visuals

Videos and Publications

pages 91-94