ALTS

Summary reports from the AccessSTEM/AccessComputing/DO-IT Longitudinal Transition Study (ALTS) are regularly updated and then published online. Research questions addressed by ALTS include:

  • What are the educational achievements of participants in DO-IT interventions?
  • Do they differ from other youth with disabilities with regard to educational achievements?
  • What are the employment outcomes of participants in DO-IT interventions? (b) Do they differ from other youth with disabilities with regard to employment achievements?
  • Which interventions are regarded as most valuable? (b) Are patterns evident linking student demographics or interests with the intervention(s) used and their perceived value, or with student pathways?

The progress of ALTS respondents are compared with that of participants in the National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS) and NLTS2 for whom postsecondary education was part of their transition plan while they were still in high school. Specifically, NLTS2 is documenting the experiences of a national sample of students with disabilities who were 13 to 16 years of age in 2000 as they move from secondary school into adult roles.

References:

Newman, L., Wagner, M., Cameto, R., & Knokey, A. M. (2009). The post-high school outcomes of youth with disabilities up to 4 years after high school. A report of findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) (NCSER 2009-3017). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

SRI International (1987-1993). National longitudinal transition study (NLTS). Menlo Park, CA: Author.

Wagner, M., Newman, L., Cameto, R., & Levine, P. (2005). After high school: A first look at the postschool experiences of youth with disabilities. A report of findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

Wagner, M., Newman, L., Cameto, R., & Levine, P. (2005). Changes over time in the early postschool outcomes of youth with disabilities. A report of findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS) and the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

Highlights from the most recent ALTS report that are most relevant to the selection of student interventions employed in the current project include:

  • When respondents were asked about their perceptions regarding the value of participation in specific activities as they prepared for college and careers,
    • access to technology was reported to be the most valuable intervention, with 79% of the respondents rating that intervention very valuable and an additional 19% rating it valuable; followed by
    • internship and other work-based learning opportunities were rated as very valuable by 55% and as valuable by another 31% of the respondents;
    • college transition workshops or camps were rated nearly as high with 42% of the participants rating these activities very valuable, and another 44% rating them as valuable; and
    • mentoring was also seen very positively, with 44% indicating that it was very valuable and another 34% rating it as valuable.
  • ALTS respondents exhibited much higher rates of high school graduation and college attendance and degree completion than reported in national data such as that available through the NLTS and NLTS2. These findings provide evidence of the effectiveness of the interventions they received, as well as a promising future for these individuals, as research indicates that students who earn college degrees are more successful in careers. Data suggest that an important impact of DO-IT programs is to increase in the sheer number of college graduates with disabilities.
  • ALTS results suggest that DO-IT activities have been effective in promoting interest in natural science and engineering for students with disabilities and, as a result, are helping to fill the gap in natural science and engineering degrees between youth with and without disabilities.

Reference:

Burgstahler, S., Moore, E., & Crawford, L. (2011). Report of the AccessSTEM/AccessComputing/DO-IT Longitudinal Transition Study (ALTS). DO-IT, Seattle.