Packaging and the Environment: Activity 1. Fill and Wrap It Up

Low Vision

Consider the position, lighting, and seating needs of the student during presentations or when using text, manipulatives, transparencies or other projected images.

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Provide large-print lecture notes, handouts, and worksheets.

To find talking calculators, consult the National Federation of the Blind Independence Market Online.

Rulers, protractors, and other measurement tools are available in tactile and large-print format from the American Printing House for the Blind. Additional measurement devices can be found at AssisTech.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Blindness

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Provide audiotaped, Brailled, or electronic-formatted lecture notes, handouts, and texts.

Give clear verbal descriptions of visual aids including video and printed content used throughout your presentation.

To find calculators for students who are blind, consult the National Federation of the Blind Independence Market Online or American Printing House for the Blind.

Rulers, protractors, and other measuring tools are available in tactile and Braille format from the American Printing House for the Blind. Additional measurement devices can be found at AssisTech.

Use tactile accommodations of graphic materials:

  • Tools for creating raised-line drawings can be found at the American Printing House for the Blind.
  • One method for drawing tactile lines on a map or diagram is to go over the lines with a pattern tracing wheel; to do this effectively, put something soft under the drawing or map first.
  • Raised-line drawings can be created with fabric paint, a glue gun, or other commercially available materials, such as Wikki Stix.
  • Additional information is available at EASI.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Hearing Impairments

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Provide a sign language interpreter, real-time captioning, and/or an FM system.

Use visual aids to explain concepts to the student.

Give assignments, lab instructions, and demonstration summaries in writing.

Use electronic mail for class and private discussions.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Learning Disabilities

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Talking calculators may be appropriate for some students. For information on talking calculators, consult Independent Living Aids.

Allow extra time for assignments and exams. Provide alternative testing arrangements.

Minimize distractions as much as possible. Keep the classroom door closed, and seat the student with attention deficits away from windows and other distractions.

Provide clear and specific instructions. Break down larger tasks into smaller chunks, and provide directions for only one or two activities at a time.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Mobility Impairments

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Assure that classrooms and labs are in wheelchair-accessible locations.

Because this unit involves manipulation of small objects, make adjustments for a student with upper body mobility impairment or fine motor coordination issues; sometimes working with a partner is effective. Also, consult lab design recommendations for students with mobility impairments at AssisTech.

Consider providing a note taker.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Health Impairments

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Provide a mechanism for students to learn material and make up assignments that they missed because of absences.

Provide flexibility in scheduling and attendance.

Talk with the student and family about any impacts of class activities on the student. Let the student know well ahead of time of classroom activities that may present a problem.

For additional information, see Disability-Related Resources on the Internet: Health Impairments.

Provide class assignments ahead of time in electronic format. Avoid last-minute additions to assignments.

Use email to facilitate communication and class discussion.

Consider providing a note taker.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.

Psychosocial Impairments

Request and encourage student input on how to best accommodate the student's learning needs.

Establish and honor classroom schedules and practices. Let the student know ahead of time of any changes to the classroom routines.

In group activities, assign the student to a group with supportive peers. Provide clear instructions so that students know exactly what is expected of them.

Help the student learn to anticipate situations that will be difficult and to plan in advance appropriate response strategies.

Consider providing a quiet area where the student can take a time-out if necessary.

Consider the needs of students with disabilities during lab orientation and lab safety meetings.

Assign group activities in which all students take responsibility and contribute according to their abilities.

Use multiple formats—oral, written, visual, tactile, electronic—for instruction and demonstrations.

For general information about accommodations for students with disabilities in science classes, consult Working Together: Science Teachers and Students with Disabilities and The Winning Equation: Access + Attitude = Success in Math and Science.

For additional information, consult the AccessSTEM Knowledge Base.