DO-IT: Research to Practice


DO-IT applies evidence-based practices for increasing the academic and career success of individuals with disabilities. The research on which DO-IT practices are based can be found in the literature reviews of the articles listed below. In addition, data that provide indicators of success can be found in articles and web pages included in this list.

Research and Evaluation

Some evaluation and research results regarding DO-IT interventions have been published in the literature and on relevant websites. They include the following.

DO-IT. (2010). Replication and Adaptation of DO-IT Practices. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., Moore, E., & Crawford, L . (2009). Report of the AccessSTEM/AccessComputing/DO-IT Longitudinal Transition Study (ALTS), Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

DO-IT. (2008). Indicators of institutional change positively correlated with DO-IT interventions. Seattle: University of Washington.

DO-IT. (2008). Success of students with disabilities positively correlated with DO-IT interventions. Seattle: University of Washington.

DO-IT. (2008). Success of the DO-IT Scholars. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Chang, C. (2007). A preliminary report of the AccessSTEM Longitudinal Tracking Study, Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Ladner, R. (2007). Increasing the participation of people with disabilities in computing fields: From research to practice. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Bellman, S. (2005). Perceived benefits of work-based learning: Differences between high school and postsecondary students with disabilities. The Asia-Pacfic Journal of Inclusive Education, 2(1), 1-20.

Burgstahler, S., Corrigan, B., & McCarter, J. (2004). Making distance learning courses accessible to students and instructors with disabilities: A case study. Internet and Higher Education, 7(2004), 233-246. Documents successful steps toward accessible design of distance learning courses.

Kim-Rupnow, W. S., & Burgstahler, S. (2004). Perceptions of students with disabilities regarding the value of technology-based support activities on postsecondary education and employment. Journal of Special Education Technology, 19. Retrospective data from participants regarding summer study and Internet-based and other activities.

Kim-Rupnow, W.S., & Burgstahler, S. (2004). Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology: Seattle's DO-IT Program. Impact, 16(3), 18-19. Summary of DO-IT interventions and impacts.

Burgstahler, S., Lopez, S., & Bellman, S. (2004). Research to practice: DO-IT prepares students with disabilities for employment. National Association of Colleges and Employers Journal, LXV(1), 27-35. Data to support value of work-based learning activities in DO-IT.

Burgstahler, S. (2003). DO-IT: Helping students with disabilities transition to college and careers. Minneapolis, MN: National Center on Secondary Education and Transition. Research to practice brief.

Burgstahler, S. (2002). The value of DO-IT to kids who did it! Exceptional Parent, 32(11), 79-86. Includes some parent feedback and other data.

Burgstahler, S. (2001). A collaborative model promotes career success for students with disabilities: How DO-IT does it. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 16(3-4), 209-216. Data supporting DO-IT's work-based learning interventions.

Burgstahler, S., & Cronheim, D. (2001). Supporting peer-peer and mentor-protege relationships on the internet. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34(1), 59-74. Data to support positive outcome related to mentor and peer support activities in DO-IT.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). Peer support: What role can the Internet play? Journal of Information Technology and Disabilities, 4(4). Data to support positive outcomes related to peer support activities of DO-IT.

Burgstahler, S., & Orvis, M. (1995). Transition to college: Preliminary findings of four case studies. In E. Makas, H. Beth, & D. Tanis (1995). Accessing the Issues: Current Research in Disability Studies (pp. 297-301). Lewiston, ME: Society for Disability Studies. Exploration of factors that support the success of students with disabilities.

DO-IT. (1995). DO-IT Annual Report 1994-1995. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Report of NSF-funded activities.

DO-IT. (1994). DO-IT Annual Report 1993-1994. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Report of NSF-funded activities.

DO-IT. (1993). DO-IT Annual Report 1992-1993. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington. Report of NSF-funded activities.

Other Articles About DO-IT's Evidence-Based Practices

Burgstahler, S., & Ladner, R. (2007). Increasing the participation of people with disabilities in computing fields: From research to practice. Seattle: AccessComputing, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (2002). Bridging the digital divide in postsecondary education: Technology access for youth with disabilities. National Center on Secondary Education and Transition Information Brief, 1(2). Includes case of a DO-IT participant.

Burgstahler, S. (2002). Mentoring on the Internet. Exceptional Parent, 32(8), 73-75. Burgstahler, S. (2002). Mentoring on the Internet. Exceptional Parent, 32(8), 73-75. DO-IT's mentoring program.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). DO-IT Scholars: Easing the transition from high school to college. Journal of Information Technology and Disabilities, 1(2). Information about DO-IT scholars.

Burgstahler, S. (1995). Students with disabilities can DO-IT! Electronic Journal on Virtual Culture, 3(3). Research to practice.