DO-IT News * August 1995

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking and Technology


Volume 3, Number 3

In This Issue:


Director's Digressions

By Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler

DO-IT SCHOLARS Caption: Do-It Scholars, Mentors and volunteers take time to get to know each other at the annual welcome barbeque.

We approach the eve of Summer Study '95, August 6-18, for DO-IT Scholars at the University of Washington. We start this summer program with two recent successes behind us, our Camp Courage Internet session and our first place award from the First Annual National Information Infrastructure Awards in the category of education. This year's Summer Study is exceptional thanks to the generosity of the instructors and volunteers who will be sharing their time and knowledge with the Scholars. All of us at DO-IT are excited about the variety of stimulating presentations we're able to offer this year.

Our schedule is packed with spectacular workshops and evening activities! The Scholars will be participating in labs on creativity, adaptive technology, the Internet, plate tectonics, digital imaging and special effects, bridge building, atmospheric sciences, life in space, surgery, telemedicine, chemistry, genetics research ethics, World Wide Web page creation, and architectural design. They will experiment with leadership principles, self-advocacy skills, college survival techniques, and portfolio development. A featured speaker is Ed Lazowska - Chair of the UW Computer Science and Engineering Department; he will talk about the future of the Internet.

Since all work and no play makes for dull DO-IT Scholars, we have also drummed up some outrageous "playtime" activities! Scholars will have opportunities to use their detective skills in a treasure hunt, exercise their muscles on a bicycle ride with Ski-for-All, learn about future technologies in the UW Virtual Reality Lab, goof off with the Mentors, stretch their creative wings by painting in the traditional Sumi style, wander in wonder at the Pacific Science Center, and talk with the animals at the Woodland Park Zoo.

Wow! You'll find a copy of our schedule on pages 6 and 7 of this newsletter. If you're going to be in the area, feel free to drop in, introduce yourself to us, and join in the activities! The more the merrier!


DO-IT Did It at Camp Courage

By Rodney

Picture of
Travis and Anthony Caption: DO-IT Scholar, Anthony, and Travis Burgstahler laugh it up at Camp Courage.

My week as a computer lab staffer at Camp Courage in Maple Lake, Minnesota was an interesting experience. DO-IT sponsored a session at the summer camp from July 10-18. Fourteen "DO-IT Courage Campers" learned the basics of e-mail, gopher, telnet, FTP, and the World Wide Web and how to transition to and be successful in college and careers. They communicated via email with DO-IT Scholars and Mentors. The program was taught primarily by Sheryl Burgstahler (Director, DO-IT) and Rick Light (a computer, math, physics, and chemistry teacher in the Woodbury School District). Guest speakers included Connie Light, on the admissions staff at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, talking about getting into college; Dr. Dave Burgstahler, Associate Professor of Accounting at the University of Washington, suggesting ways to work with faculty members and succeed in college; and Roger Upcraft, Camp Courage administrator, discussing strategies for getting and keeping a job.

Disabilities represented by the DO-IT Courage Campers in this session included blindness, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy, and other mobility impairments. Campers ranged in age from 13 to 19 and came from Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

Phase II DO-IT Scholar Anthony came from North Dakota to assist me as a student helper and was a big help. He has been a regular camper at Camp Courage Before.

The DO-IT Scholars Program costs a lot of money. The impact of the program -- to educate students with disabilities in science, engineering, mathematics, and the Internet -- is extended by featuring aspects of the program like Internet training and college preparation activities at different locations such as Camp Courage. We hope to do this again!

The program was a big success, with DO-IT Courage Campers learning the basic lessons and some excelling quickly through the program beyond our lessons. The only unfortunate thing is that some of these kids may go home and not be able to get back on the 'Net for quite some time to use the things they've learned here. The DO-IT Scholars are lucky!

Unlike the DO-IT Scholars program, participants in the DO-IT Camp Courage session used the computers in camp, but didn't take them home or maintain their Internet accounts after the session ended. We look forward to repeating this program next year and hope that we can find ways for campers to access permanent accounts.


Courage Campers Speak

Brad uses the Net Caption: DO-IT Courage Camper Brad learns how to use the Internet

Date: Sat, 15 Jul 1995
From: Lisa Boutain <doit@u.washington.edu>
To: Rodney <rodneyl@u.washington.edu>
Subject: doitnews

Hi! My name is Lisa Boutian. I am seventeen years old, I will be entering the eleventh grade next year. This was my first experience at computer camp. The staff was fun and helpful but a little crazy. A few days ago, we visited St. Cloud State University to take a tour of the campus. It was an interesting field trip. I have met a lot of great people here, and I hope to return next year. I would like to say thank you to all of the DO-IT people who sent me mail while I was here.


Date: Sat, 15 Jul 1995
From: Brad <doit10@u.washington.edu>
To: Rodney <rodneyl@u.washington.edu>
Cc: sherylb@cac.washington.edu
Subject: doitnews

Hi my name is Brad and I'm fourteen years old and this my first year at Camp Courage. I really enjoy being on the internet because it gives me a chance to talk to people that you don't know and that you do know. I was writing to some of my friends on th e Internet and one of my friends that I was talking to from the DO-IT program knew one of my friends from school and she gave me her adress. So we wrote back and forth. That is a little bit that you can do on the net.


My Week Helping at Camp

By Anthony

During the week of July 10-18, Sheryl, Rodney and I were at Courage Camp. I helped at a technology learning program which was like the DO-IT Program at the University of Washington. We used some of the same lessons and subjects as Scholars use in Seattle. Fourteen kids attended the camp. As well as learning how to use the Internet, one day they toured St. Cloud State University.

My main job was to get information out to the campers and to keep Scholars and Mentors at DO-IT informed as to what was going on. It was also important that I keep a line of communication up between Scholars and DO-IT Courage Campers. I helped in the computer lab and tried to answer questions and give ideas on disability issues.

I found the camp interesting, being it was my first time acting like a Mentor. The thing that was most interesting was the progress of the kids on their lessons and the innovative ideas they came up with from their lessons.

It also helped me see what I'll be doing when I become a DO-IT Ambassador. It was a win-win situation. I am already planning for next year if they need me again. I really enjoyed my job knowing that the kids went home with a better outlook on life as far as careers and college go.


DO-IT Program Named "Champion of Cyberspace"

By Rodney and L.G. Blanchard

The University of Washington's (UW) DO-IT program has been nationally recognized for its innovation and excellence-- DO-IT captured first place in the education category of the first annual National Information Infrastructure (NII) Awards program and was one of six programs honored at the NII awards ceremony on July 12 in Washington, D.C. The awards recognize some of the country's most innovative and practical uses of the Internet.

Dick Cavett was master of ceremonies at the awards banquet and Vice President Al Gore participated via a videotaped message. The judges reviewed more than 500 entries and the judges' final decisions were announced for each of the six categories: arts and entertainment, business, community, education, government and health. Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler, DO-IT director, accepted the NII award on behalf of DO-IT. Dr. J. Ray Bowen, project Principal Investigator and Dean of the UW College of Engineering, also attended the ceremony.

Now in its third year, DO-IT, funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, focuses on high school students with disabilities who are interested in science, engineering, mathematics or technology. The DO-IT Scholars part of the DO-IT program has two main components:

If a student doesn't own a computer, he or she can borrow one from DO-IT, along with a modem and any other necessary adaptive equipment and software.

The summer 1995 residential program, scheduled to begin Aug. 6, will bring 20 new DO-IT scholars to the UW campus from Idaho, Oregon, Montana, North Dakota and Washington. They will be joined by returning students from among 36 participants in one or more of the program's first two residential programs.

In addition to DO-IT, other NII award winners were HotWired, (arts and entertainment); National Materials Exchange Network (business); the Alzheimer's Disease Support Center (community); the Utah Library Network Initiative (government); and the Information Network for Public Health Officials of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (health).

The NII refers to the nationwide combination of public and private computer networks operated by businesses, commercial carriers, schools, communities and government agencies. The NII awards were sponsored by more than 70 industry, government and community organizations as part of a public education program to accelerate the development and use of the information superstructure.

Note: You can reach the NII Awards home page through the DO-IT home page. http://www.washington.edu/doit/ Look for the "news flash".


Nii 
Awards Ceremony Caption: Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler (second from left) and Dr. Ray Bowen (far right) attend the NII Awards Ceremony with spouses Dave and Priscilla.

Sheryl's acceptance remarks at the NII Awards Ceremony, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Washington, D.C.

I am the lucky one who gets to accept this award on behalf of the entire DO-IT team - participants, staff, volunteers, and sponsors.

In project DO-IT a teenager who is blind reads the news independently for the first time in his life. He uses a computer, screen reading software, and a speech synthesizer to access news feeds on the NII.

In project DO-IT deaf students and mentors communicate with others without assistance - over the Internet.

In DO-IT a person without use of his hands presses the keys on his keyboard with a mouth stick. He has a job developing Web pages and training others in the use of the Internet.

In DO-IT a young woman who is blind attends college with a four-year scholarship from NASA. She shares her experiences with high school students with disabilities from a five-state region using electronic mail.

In DO-IT students from cities and rural communities, from rich and poor families, from a variety of ethnic backgrounds, and with disabilities that affect their vision, hearing, mobility, health, and learning, come together in an electronic community and experience life on a level playing field.

Today, the DO-IT project, which is primarily funded by the National Science Foundation, is honored to receive an award for its creative use of the national information infrastructure. We look forward to the day when stories like ours are no longer exceptional, but commonplace. Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler
Director, DO-IT
University of Washington

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 9255803. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Accolades from NSF

We at the National Science Foundation are thrilled that DO-IT is now officially recognized nationally for its innovations and leadership in use of Internet. It is unusual that a project devoted to assisting people with disabilities is acknowledged at this high level. We are proud to be associated with all of the DO-IT staff, students, and mentors. My personal congratulations to Sheryl, Ray, and all the others at the University who have contributed so much of their time and talent to this project.

Larry Scadden
National Science Foundation

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 9255803. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

DO-IT Wins Higher Education Award

Congratulations to DO-IT for winning the 1995 Organization Award from the Washington Association on Postsecondary Education and Disability (WAPED). WAPED is the proffessional organization for staff of diabled student services offices for two-year and four-year institutions of higher education across the state. The award was presented to DO-IT in May for "an outstanding record of service to people with disabilities in higher education."

DO-IT Phase I Summer Study Schedule - August 6-18, 1995

Sunday, August 6
Monday, August 7
Tuesday, August 8
Wednesday, August 9
Thursday, August 10
Friday, August 11
Saturday, August 12
Sunday, August 13
Monday, August 14
Tuesday, August 15
Wednesday, August 16
Thursday, August 17
Friday, August 18


Sunday, August 6

4:00-5:30
Registration
(McCarty Residence Hall Lobby)

5:30-6:15
Introduction for Scholars and Parents - Sheryl Burgstahler
(McCarty Residence Hall Lobby)
  • Welcome- Sheryl discusses schedule, rules, and expectations
  • RA talk/tour about McCarty Residence Hall rules/emergency escape routes

6:30-9:00
BBQ/ Icebreaker/ Mingling
(McMahon Residence Hall Deck)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Monday, August 7

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

9:00-9:30
Welcome - Sheryl Burgstahler, Computing & Communications
(Savery 243) Overview of program expectations and rules, Phase I, II, III description; What comes next?

9:30-10:30
Finding Your Rainbow - Graham Allan, Forestry and Chemical Engineering
(Savery 243) Discuss how to develop your interests and create opportunities in fields that intrigue you. Develop a useful format for creating an electronic journal to track the development of your inventive ideas.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Let's DO-IT Together! - Elise Dallimore, Speech Communication
(Savery 243) Discuss the advantages of working in groups as a learning strategy. Engage in some exercises that will hone your skills for future group work.

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)

2:00-3:30
DO-IT With Computers - Dan Comden and Janis Funk, Technology
(HUB 106B) An overview of how adaptive technology is useful for people who have disabilities and descriptions of the systems y'all are using. Be prepared to describe how your system works and how it helps you.

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems - Sheryl Burgstahler
(HUB 106B) Discover where you fit into the Internet and how to make the best use of it. Take a peek at the UW and DO-IT World Wibe Web home pages.

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Treasure Hunt - (meet in McCarty Library)
Join us for the greatest treasure hunt of all time! Even Sherlock Holmes would have his work cut out for him on this one.

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Tuesday, August 8

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30-10:30
Internet Netiquette - Sheryl Burgstahler
(HUB 106B) Miss Manners has some competition here. Learn basic netiquette, net safety, and guidelines from the expert!

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Internet Netiquette - Sheryl Burgstahler (HUB 106B)

12:30-2:00
Lunch Break (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
Where's It Shakin' and Why? Plate Tectonics/Earthquake Tracking- John Smith, Science Education
(HUB 106B) Discuss plate tectonics and track some earthquakes of your own using the Internet. Can you predict where the "Big One" is going to hit next?

3:30-4:00
Snack break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Evening Activities - anyone for a game of volleyball, a movie, or some time in the computer lab? (Meet in McCarty Lounge)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Wednesday, August 9

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30-10:30
It's the Image That Counts! - Steve Tanimoto, Computer Science
(HUB 106B) You've been wondering, well wonder no longer. Discover how math really can be useful for finding information in digital images and creating special effects.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
It's the Image that Counts! - Steve Tanimoto (continued)

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab(HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
Gotta Bridge That Gap! - Greg Miller, Civil Engineering
(MEB 234) Design a bridge and learn which design factors are integral to making it stable.

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Virtual Reality Lab Tour (Meet in HUB 106B)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Thursday, August 10

7:30-9:00
Breakfast (McMahon Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30-10:45
Up, Up, and Away into the Atmosphere! Imke Durre, Atmospheric Sciences
(HUB 106B) Launch and track a weather balloon. Experiment with climate modeling. Use the Internet to complete a homework assignment on weather and climate. Due Thursday, August 17!

10:45-11:15
Snack Break

11:15-12:30
Up, Up, and Away into the Atmosphere! (continued) (HUB 106B)

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
Life in Space - Pinky Nelson, Astronomy
(HUB 106B) Learn all about life in space from someone who has been there.

3:30-4:00
Snack Break (HUB Husky Den, upper floor)

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Bicycling with Ski-for-All (meet in HUB 106B)
How long has it been since you've felt the wind rushing through your eyelashes? Are you an adventurous soul? If so, we have the bicycle for you- modified to fit your every need.

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Friday, August 11

7:30-9:00
Breakfast (McMahon Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30- 10:30
Dr. DO-IT - Laurie Clark, Biology
(MEB 234) Perform heart surgery and replace a valve for a needy sheep.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Dr. DO-IT, continued (MEB 234)

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
Telemedicine - Kerry Meyers, Medical Engineering
(HUB 106B)

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Evening Activities - anyone for a game of volleyball, a movie, or some time in the computer lab? (Meet in McCarty Lounge)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Saturday, August 12

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

9:30
Meet in McCarty Residence Hall Lobby

10:00
Bus leaves for Pacific Science Center from HUB Parking Lot

10:30
Arrive Pacific Science Center
(Meet at Dinosaur pond, lower level, then divide into groups)

12:00 or 1:00
Destiny in Space (IMAX Theater, upper level)

12:00 or 1:00
Lunch (Pacific Science Center Cafe, upper level)

2:00 or 4:00
Celestial Odyssey Laser (Laser Arena, lower level)

4:45
Meet at Dinosaur Pond in Pacific Science Center (lower level)

5:00
Load bus for return to University of Washington

6:30-9:00
BBQ (McMahon Deck)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Sunday, August 13

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-11:00
Church (optional) or Athletic Activities

11:30
Meet at McCarty Residence Hall Lobby

11:30
Meet in the HUB parking lot

12:00
Bus leaves for Woodland Park Zoo

12:30
Picnic Lunch at the Zoo

1:00-4:00
DO-IT at Da Woodland Park Zoo

4:30
Meet at main gate to load bus

5:00
Bus leaves from zoo to University of Washington

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Evening Activities - anyone for a game of volleyball or a movie? (Meet in McCarty Lounge)

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Monday, August 14

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30- 10:30
Is That Really Water? - Bill Zoller, Chemistry and Environmental Studies
(HUB 106B) Participate in lab experiments to determine what's in Lake Washington water and how the water quality has an impact on environmental issues.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Is That Really Water? - Bill Zoller, continued

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
You Can DO-IT!
(HUB 106B) Be a more effective communicator! Learn how to work with people to get what you need. Experiment with some self-advocacy and communication techniques.

3:30-4:00
Snack break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Sumi Painting Workshop-Sharon and Alan Jodock-King
(McCarty Library) Ancient Chinese proverb say, "All work and no play makes dull DO-IT Scholar." Here's an opportunity to let your creative juices flow out of your body and onto rice paper. Anyone can create something beautiful when they express what's in their heart.

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Tuesday, August 15

7:30
Breakfast (Mahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30- 10:30
Helpful or Harmful? The Ethics of Genetics Research - Robert Hansen, Genetics
(HUB 106B) Learn how to use a structured model to make decisions about ethical issues in genetics research.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Ethics of Genetics Lab, continued

12:30-2:00
Brown Bag Lunch Discussion with Maynard Olson, Medical Genetics
(HUB 108) Discuss the future of genetics research with someone who works in the thick of it and think about the impact that it might have on the lives of those you love.

2:00-3:30
You Can DO-IT!
(HUB 106B) Learn how to set goals and manage your time in order to make them happen. "If you can conceive it, and believe it, you can achieve it."

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

!!Mentor Night!!

6:00-9:30 pm
Introductions and pizza for all!- Sheryl Burgstahler
(HUB 200BC)
  • Drivers Ed for the Information Highway -Edward Lazowska, Computer Science
    (HUB 200BC) Learn about the changes that are taking place in information technology, and what the implications are for education, government, and commerce.
  • What's in a Mentor? Group activity
    (HUB 200BC) Here's your opportunity to meet one another, get to know each other's hopes and dreams, and figure out who can be what kind of a resource- in other words, it's non-Internet "Network" time!

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Wednesday, August 16

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

9:30- 10:30
It's a Wild Web World! - Dave Edfeldt, Education
(HUB 106B) Learn more about how the World Wide Web gets built. Add your two cents to the award-winning DO-IT World Wide Web page.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
It's a Wild Web World!, continued (HUB 106B)

12:30-2:00
Lunch(Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-3:30
You Can DO-IT!
(HUB 106B) We did it, so can you! Learn from those who have done it! You can ask our special guests to share some of their ideas about what to expect when you go to college or work.

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
We Did It, So Can You! - Phase II Scholars
(HUB 106B) Phase II Scholars share their project success stories and help you formulate your plans for your Phase II projects.

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Thursday, August 17

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-9:30
Computer Lab Open (HUB 106B)

9:30-10:30
Design Dilemmas- Mike Gaffney, Design Engineering
(HUB106B) Learn how 3-d computer modeling is used to design building interiors, exteriors, and sites.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Design Dilemmas - Mike Gaffney, continued

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)
Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

2:00-2:45
You Can DO-IT
(HUB 106B) Focus on you're future! Start a portfolio that you can use to apply for awards, internships, collaborative projects, and jobs.

2:45-3:30
Focus Group Discussion - Norma Shelan (HUB 200C)

3:30-4:00
Snack Break

4:00-5:30
Internet Gems and Open Computer Lab (HUB 106B)

5:30
Dinner (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

7:00-9:00
Bicycling with Ski-for-All (Meet in McCarty Lounge)
Same bat-channel, same bat-time.

9:00
All Scholars must be in McCarty Residence Hall

10:00-11:00
Dorm wind-down activities (videos, games, pool, etc.)

11:00
All Scholars must be in rooms at McCarty Residence Hall

Friday, August 18

7:30
Breakfast (McMahon Residence Hall Cafeteria)

8:30-10:30
Computer Lab Open (HUB 106B)
Finish up any loose ends: evaluations, stories, earthquake tracking, Internet searching, email, DO-IT news article, creativity journal.

10:30-11:00
Snack Break

11:00-12:30
Phase I Group Discussion (HUB 106B)

12:30-2:00
Lunch (Husky Den)

2:00-3:00
Phase II Summer Study Reports (McCarty Library)

3:00-4:00
Closing Ceremony (McCarty Library)

5:00
Bye! See ya in Cyberspace!

9:00
Scholars who are staying the night must be in McCarty Residence Hall

College Life

Some advice by Mark, DO-IT Ambassador

Picture of Mark Caption: DO-IT Ambassador Mark and Instructor Laurie Clark work together on a science lab experiment

I graduated from high school in spring of 1994 and attended Big Bend Community College this year. I have muscular dystrophy--Duchenne's, use a wheelchair, and have limited use of my hands. So far, I have had no accommodation problems in college. It has been fine academically, though it has been a flop in the social sense.

When those of you who haven't gone yet go, I suggest being aggressive in enjoying the student body activities available. I have basically been sitting around doing absolutely nothing fun, and I don't recommend this course of action. Make yourself available at the campus and hang around as much as possible--this is something I am currently trying to do more of.

Transportation-wise, I have been fortunate in that my cousin and I have taken the same classes, and therefore we drive over together and I have someone to assist me. Make sure, those of you who are physically disabled, that you take advantage of things such as note-takers (on second thought, I guess you can do that if you have any disability). So far, I have done this in one class because my cousin has terrible handwriting.

Actually, I would recommend against full reliance on a single individual, because--at least in my case--instructors tend to lump you and that person together, and this seems to happen with others as well. The college has an obligation to provide you assistance in class. And the State Vocational Rehabilitation can pay for books and adaptive equipment if you don't qualify for other aid.


DOIT's Calendar of Events

Northwest High-Tech Career Expo
October 10-11, 1995
A two day recruitment event for leading high-tech companies in Seattle, featuring 85+ top companies, Seattle Center Exhibition Hall; 11 am- 7 pm. For more information call (206) 883-2240 or email annexpo@AOL.com.

Closing the Gap Conference
October 7-21, 1995
Microcomputer technology in Special Education and Rehabilitation. A leading source for information on application of microcomputer technology for person with disabilities. Radisson South Hotel and Hotel Sofitel, Minneapolis, MN. For information contact Closing the Gap, P.O. Box 68, Henderson, MN 56044; phone (612) 248-3294; fax (612) 248-3810.

Washington State Head Injury Conference
October 20-21, 1995
Quality of life issues,innovative service delivery, funding issues, and evaluation of programs. Focus is on the needs of survivors, family members, and consumers. Harry Jacobs, Ph.D of Druckers Brain Injury Center and Temple University, is the featured speaker. For more information call (206) 451-0000.

Washington Occupational Therapy Association (WOTA) October 27-28, 1995
"What the Future Holds: Occupational Therapy Practice in the 21st Century" West Coast Tyee Hotel, Olympia, Washington. For more information contact Linda Higgins, WOTA Conference, 4947 N. Vassault ST, Tacoma, WA 98407; (206) 759-5450


DO-IT Does it on UWTV

DO-IT is airing DO-IT videotapes and presentation on the University of Washington's regional (Seattle Area) UWTV cable TV channel this summer and fall

SPECIAL FEATURE

August 4 at 7:30 pm and August 5 at 10pm
"Creating a world of Opportunities - Liberating People with Disabilites through Disabilites through Adaptive Technologies A satellite update on new technology availible for people cosponsored by RIT and ESAI.

DO-IT Working Together Series

In this series people with disabilities suggest how educators, adapted environments, and technology can ensure euqal access to education and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities

Sunday,August 6, 8:30 pm
"Working Together: Faculty and Students with Disabilites" Conversations with sucessfull college students with disabilites and faculty, who share their experiences working together.

"Working Together with Disabilites and Computer Technology" Overview of adaptive technology and useful applications of computer network resources for individual with disabiltes.

Sunday,August 13, 8:30 pm
"DO-IT Scholars" Overview of the DO-IT Scholars programs for high school students with disabilities, featuring participants.

"Working Together with Disabilites and Computer Technology" Overview of adaptive technology and useful applications of computer network resources for individual with disabiltes.

Sunday, September 17, 8:30 pm
"A Learning Community: People with Disabilities on the Net. Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler, Dean Martineau, Jenny, and Rodney, DO-IT, University of Washington. The Internet enhances communication and information access for people with disabilities.

Sunday, September 24, 8:30 pm
"Working Together: Science and Students with Disabilities" Suggestion by successful students for making science and labs accessible.

"Working Together with Disabilites and Computer Technology" Overview of adaptive technology and useful applications of computer network resources for individual with disabiltes.


DO-IT Mentors

By Rodney

DO-IT 
Mentors Caption: DO-IT Mentor Shem Bingman laughs with DO-IT Ambassador Nhi.

Aside from DO-IT Scholars, staff, volunteers and sponsors, there is another integral group of people who make the program what it is -- we call them Mentors. Mentors are assigned to a group of students as they become DO-IT Scholars. However, any Mentor can talk to any Scholar -- and vice versa -- about careers, college, and life in general. Mentors are college students, practicing scientists, and engineers, some with disabilities themselves. The disabilities faced by some of the Mentors are as wide ranging as those faced by Scholars.

Mentors have been as close as graduate students at the University of Washington, where DO-IT is located, or from as far away as Scotland and Australia. Mentors living that far away are limited to Scholar contact through e-mail, whereas Mentors living in the Seattle area can visit campus during the Summer Study and take part in labs and other activities. The philosophy behind the Mentor program is that most of us sometime in our lives have had an individual who has guided us in one direction or another, has taught us a skill or the correct way of doing something, has been a role model, or has just been there for us to talk to. This is the same role that a Mentor fills in the DO-IT Program.

In addition, Mentors are there to help Scholars with DO-IT projects. At the end of Summer Study I, Scholars must find a year long project to work on, preferably involving the INternet. This is where Mentors come in -- to help the Scholar meet their goals. Mentors also serve as role models, letting Scholars know who they are, what disabilities challenge them, the kind of academic and/or career workload they have, and what helps them to keep going from to day.

DO-IT continually recruits Mentors. If you're interested, or you know somebody who might be, e-mail doit@u.washington.edu and request an application. To write a letter to the Mentor group, send e-mail to mentors@u.washington.edu


Scholar Ben

Picture of Ben

My name is Ben and I would like to tell you how the DO-IT program has changed my view on life.

For years I haven't been able to walk or lift my arms. So I let my fingers shine and played video games. But whenever the word "computer" came into conversation, I couldn't relate because I couldn't hold my arms up to type. One of the worst feelings I had was when I watched someone else enjoying a computer, because I couldn't.

I know how others like me have felt. We got mad, asking why God gave us this disease or wondering why we were different from everybody else. Sometimes we couldn't take it any more and felt alone in the world.

But when I entered the DO-IT program that all changed. I learned to use a speech-activated system and felt triumphant when I could use a computer. From the very first e-mail to cruising the Internet, the only thing I have on my mind is "What can I not do!?!"

We DO-IT Scholars are all going to succeed! We are smart enough and now that we have the power of a computer, the gold that was always just out of reach can now be grasped.

Mentor Steve Harper

Picture of Steve Harper

My name is Steve Harper, I'm one of the newest Mentors. I have cerebral palsy. Maybe some of you have it. In case some of you don't know what it is let me explain it to you. Cerebral palsy occurs when the brain doesn't get enough oxygen. It usually aff ects the body's muscles, although it can cause some learning problems too. I've got my share of it--"gee I'm lucky"--I can't walk or verbally talk. I use a Morse code communicator which is mounted on the front of my wheelchair. I have two switches on each side of my head where I tap out the Morse code. My right side switch is dots, left side is dashes, and I drive my wheelchair using my head, too. I have this thing called "KE:NX," a special adapter that allows me to use my Morse code to use a Macintosh so I can communicate with you.

When I was five I started going to a special school for the disabled called Maplewood. My speech therapist made a communication board so I could communicate somewhat. Then they decided that I was smart enough to mainstream me in regular school. It was about 1976, so it was a few years after that law was passed--you know, the law that says disabled children have the right to be educated equally. So Maplewood put me in the second grade, with a not-so-good communication board.

When I was in the sixth grade, my speech therapist back at Maplewood heard about a project that was going on at the good old UW. It was a Morse code grant for nonverbal children. So they called her and asked her if she knew any children who could benefit from this type of program. She gave out two girls' names and my name. At first, my parents and I didn't like the Morse code idea. Because I could communicate to some extent, we didn't see the point of trying the program. However, my speech therapist harassed us so much that we agreed to set up an appointment with the grant people at the UW. By the end of that appointment I was on that grant. I learned the Morse code in about two weeks. My life was much easier when I got the Morse code communicator , because I could communicate twice as fast as before, and I could communicate all by myself without anyone looking to see what I was saying.

I graduated from Lynnwood High School in 1987. In 1988, I heard about a program at Shoreline Community College called the Community Integration Program. This program provides academic support for people with Cerebral Palsy. That's where I've gone ever since. However, I'm FINALLY planning to transfer to the University of Washington next year and major in computers.

My hobbies are computers; all types of sports, especially football; and rock music, especially the Scorpions--hey, I might be old by Scholar standards, but I'm not that old!

All of you should take heart. If I can graduate from high school and eventually end up going to a major university, I know all of you can DO-IT too!


More About DO-IT

DO-IT News is published at the University of Washington with input from the staff, Scholars and Mentors of DO-IT. The College of Engineering and Computing & Communications coordinate the program. DO-IT is primarily funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

To request more information.


This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 9255803. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.