DO-IT Electronic Resources

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publications, tutorials, case studies, FAQs, promising practices, and video presentations

"We were led to your website and felt like we stumbled on a gold mine. Your materials are excellent, and we would very much like to use them in training and awareness programs for our faculty."
-Academic Instructional
Communication Specialist

"An excellent website of comprehensive resources that any instructor can have access to 24 hours a day!"
-Instructor

"We will link [The Faculty Room] to our website at [our college]. I've already sent an announcement out to our college to look this site over. I want to personally thank DO-IT for all the timely and helpful information that you have and share with us. You make our job as service providers very easy to do."
-Learning Center Director

DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) promotes:

DO-IT's printed publications, tutorials, and training videotapes, as well as links to Internet resources, are available on its comprehensive website at http://www.washington.edu/doit/. Visitors can also find searchable knowledge bases and web-based learning environments for specific audiences. Below are highlights of this rich resource for educators, policy makers, librarians, technical support staff, students and employees with disabilities, and their advocates.

Technology and Universal Design

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/technology.html
DO-IT provides a rich set of tutorials, videotapes, publications, and resources related to access to computers, videotapes, web pages, online learning, telecommunications, and other information technologies for people with disabilities.

AccessIT

http://www.washington.edu/accessit/
AccessIT promotes the procurement, development, and use of accessible information technology (IT) in educational institutions at all levels. The AccessIT knowledge base is a searchable collection of questions and answers, case studies, and promising practices regarding accessible IT in educational settings, co-sponsored by DO-IT and the University of Washington Center for Technology and Disability Studies.

AccessSTEM

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/
AccessSTEM serves to increase the participation of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. The AccessSTEM searchable knowledge base includes information about universal design of instruction and electronic resources, strategies for making STEM classes and labs accessible to all students, and assistive technology for students with disabilities.

Sample of AccessSTEM Knowledge Base Questions

How can a student who is blind make measurements in a science lab?

What are computer access options for a person who cannot operate a standard keyboard or mouse?

Is my school legally required to make our web pages accessible?

What academic accommodations are typical for students with learning disabilities?

What challenges do students with disabilities face as they transition from two-year to four-year colleges?

How can students with disabilities get accommodations for taking PSAT, SAT, ACT, and Advanced Placement exams?

AccessCAREERS

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Careers/
Making a successful transition to employment is the focus of AccessCAREERS. It provides programs and resources for students, K-12 teachers, postsecondary educators, parents, mentors, and employers. The AccessCAREERS searchable knowledge base includes questions and answers, case studies, and promising practices related to career success for people with disabilities.

The Faculty Room

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/
The Faculty Room is a place for postsecondary faculty and administrators to learn about how to create classroom environments and activities that maximize the learning of all students, including those with disabilities. Legal issues, universal design principles, and accommodation strategies are included in interactive, multimedia, and searchable resources.

The Student Services Conference Room

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Conf/
The Conference Room is a place for staff in postsecondary libraries; admissions, financial aid, and registration offices; computer labs; and other campus services. It includes a searchable database of frequently asked questions, promising practices, and tips on how to create accessible student services organizations.

The Board Room

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Board/
The Board Room provides guidance to postsecondary administrators regarding policies and practices that maximize the learning and participation of all students, including those with disabilities.

The Student Lounge

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Student/
The Student Lounge helps students with disabilities prepare for and succeed in postsecondary studies.

About DO-IT

DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) serves to increase the successful participation of individuals with disabilities in challenging academic programs such as those in science, engineering, mathematics, and technology. Primary funding for DO-IT is provided by the National Science Foundation, the State of Washington, and the U.S. Department of Education. DO-IT is a collaboration of UW Information Technology and the Colleges of Engineering and Education at the University of Washington.

To order free publications or newsletters use the DO-IT Publications Order Form; to order videos and training materials use the Videos, Books and Comprehensive Training Materials Order Form.

For further information, to be placed on the DO-IT mailing list, request materials in an alternate format, or to make comments or suggestions about DO-IT publications or web pages contact:

DO-IT
University of Washington
Box 354842
Seattle, WA 98195-4842
doit@uw.edu
www.uw.edu/doit/
206-685-DOIT (3648) (voice/TTY)
888-972-DOIT (3648) (voice/TTY)
206-221-4171 (fax)
509-328-9331 (voice/TTY) Spokane

Founder and Director: Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D.

DO-IT Funding and Partners


Copyright © 2004, 2003, University of Washington. Permission is granted to copy these materials for educational, non-commercial purposes provided the source is acknowledged.