Letters

The Goodness of Gates

I am a proud graduate from the Class of 1957. Like most of the University’s thousands of graduates, most of us have lived moderately successful, yet undistinguished lives. Mr. Gates (Mighty Is The Man Who Wears The Purple And The Gold, June) is truly “a Black Swan event.” His impact on the University, his community and the world has been enormous, for which we are fortunate.

MYLES RONALD JOHNS
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

As a frequenter of the University District Burgermaster, I associated with the “old timers” who knew who was the “real” Bill Gates and I acquired the habit of referring to Bill Gates Jr. as “the kid.” As you travel, and people learn you’re from Seattle, they asked you if you know “Bill Gates.” I always asked, “The Dad or the kid?”

KEN JACOBSEN, ’72
Seattle

I think this amazing article would inspire UW graduates and students to strive to achieve more success by undertaking continuous professional and personal development programs to broaden their horizons. Bill Gates Sr. is truly an iconic achiever and a great role model to us all!

MARYANNE TP FONG, ’77
UW ALUM, FRIEND & SUPPORTER
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Cancer and Courage

I loved Diane Mapes’ article (Reconstructing Hope, June). It is the best I’ve read regarding breast cancer and the recovery process. I haven’t been this touched by an article in a long time. Not only did I laugh out loud many times while reading it but there were times when I was also close to tears. The breast regeneration contraption called Brava (more appropriately referred to as “the Brunhilda Bra”) sounds like both a miracle and a torture device. Thank you to Diane Mapes for educating me, entertaining me and giving me a glimpse into the life of a courageous, strong, vulnerable and very, very funny woman.

PEG CHENG
M.A., PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, ’96
SEATTLE

Diane, I think you’re one bad-ass woman! I have not had the misfortune to ever have breast cancer, but have followed your story. Keep your chin up and your Brava strapped on! I admire your strength and courage. Looking forward to reading more from you.

CHARY D. SILMSER
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Having gone through it myself, your article brought back a lot of memories. As you finished, we are here to talk about it and to help others. It is a great option for women.

JOAN SEDA
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Wow, you go, you brave strong inspirational gal. I have been where you have been. Read my blog jojolev.blogspot.com, where I share my story, which makes me lucky. I wish you a “breast-ful” future.

JOANNA LEVITON
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

This procedure was introduced to me last month, when I once again declined to reconstruct any other way (I am 44 and am very active, can’t be giving up muscle, not into scars). It will be a brand new surgery for my surgeon. She hopes to be able to offer it to me in the fall and I have so many doubts. I love the details you present, especially how hard it is to get started, and sleep. Sending you love and healing light!

ANDREA
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Wow, this is an amazing story! I was diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in 1999. I had a partial mastectomy on my right side and radiation therapy. I was only 43 and in the best shape of my life. I have had reconstruction (lastisimus flap) and continue to need surgeries and revisions to try to make me look normal. Well, it has been five years since my last revision (changing from saline to silicone implants) and I am a patchwork full of scars. My right breast looks very unnatural and does not match my left one. I look pretty good with clothes on, but kind of shocking when naked.

This procedure (Brava) sounds wonderful and I hope it helps many lovelies! I am very happy to be alive, but still miss my natural breasts. Thank you so much for sharing your story, there are many women that you have helped today by writing this story! God bless you and your new girls!

CAROL UNGER
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

As the son of a two-time breast cancer survivor, I find this article inspiring, humorous and well-written. Bravo, Diane!

ERIC ALTHOFF
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Honoring Thy Father

What a wonderful story (Moving Mission, June) and tribute to a father. To know that this run takes place every year, makes it all the more meaningful and the money raised for the American Cancer Society is indeed making a difference in
helping so many people and families with cancer.

Great job, Patrick, for starting something that will continue on in your Dad’s loving memory.

CAROL NICHOLS
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

I am deeply touched by this story in a very personal way. It is wonderful to know more about this annual event and how we can all be involved. Great work!

PAGE HENKEL CHANCE
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

There’s Danger in the Air

[Your story (Keeping Cool, June) was] interesting and scary because as the climate gets more moist over time, I’m imagining all the germs that we could catch because they will be in the air and saliva contact will not necessarily be a limitation to getting infected with airborne viruses.

I’m also thinking of the “contagion” that I always heard about in New York that comes alive and ever so pungent every summer, exploding out of subways and manholes. Each summer, the smell is worse and worse and I’m sure bacteria, bad strains, etc., will only get worse as we have a moister atmosphere in the coming years.

VANESSA VILLALOBOS, ’00
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Farewell, Dear Friend

I am very sad to hear of the death of Bryan Pearce (A Good Man, June). I knew him at SPU and he always was a good friend. He loved music and was kind and uplifting. He will be missed by all.

FAYE KIRKENDALL
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Purple Runway

Yay! Go Dawgs! And go Husky track & field (Purple Lane, June)! It’s so exciting to see the pictures and read the news about the new purple track that’s just for Track. Can’t wait to see it in person.

Evelyn Ho, ’77
VIA COLUMNS ONLINE

Don’t Forget Golden Ridge

My husband and I own a vineyard and winery in Walla Walla: Golden Ridge Cellars (Purple Gold, December). My husband studied enology and viticulture at WWCC.

MICHAEL J. RASCH, J.D., ’87, WINEMAKER
CYNTHIA (CINDY) L. RASCH B.S., ’87, M.D., ’91, EXEC MHA, ’08

Farewell to Two University District Icons

Over the past 20 years, UW students had the shared experience of stopping by The Continental on The Ave for Greek food and shopping at the Safeway on Brooklyn, where we would invariably be greeted by Ed McClain, who sold Real Change. McClain cheerfully announced, “Real Change? Have a great day, ma’am [or sir]” to everyone who came by. Sadly, this past spring that all came to an end. McClain died May 3 at the age of 69, and The Continental closed June 30 after 40 years.

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