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Shared Leave
Definitions and Questions & Answers

Shared Leave Definitions

Approved Emergency Worker
An employee is considered to be an "approved emergency worker" when:
  • The federal or any state government has declared a state of emergency anywhere within the United States; and,
  • The employee has the skills needed to assist in responding to the emergency or its aftermath, and volunteers his or her services to either a governmental agency or to a nonprofit organization engaged in humanitarian relief in the devastated area; and,
  • The governmental agency or nonprofit organization accepts the employee's offer of volunteer services
Day
A day for full-time employees is 8 hours; for part-time employees a day is pro-rated according to the FTE. For example:
  • 100% = 1.0 FTE = 8 hours per day (full-time)
  • 75% = 0.75 FTE = 6 hours per day (3/4 time)
  • 50% = 0.50 FTE = 4 hours per day (1/2 time)
Extraordinary or Severe Illness or Injury
Examples include cancer, major surgery, chemotherapy, broken back, fractured pelvis, liver transplant, heart transplant, AIDS, fetal endangerment, hysterectomy.
Household Member
A person who resides in the same home and who provides reciprocal personal and financial support to the employee.
Relative
A spouse, child, stepchild, grandchild, parent, or grandparent.
Uniformed Services
The uniformed services of the Unites States include:
  • United States Air Force (USAF)
  • United States Army (USA)
  • United States Coast Guard (USCG)
  • United States Marine Corps (USMC)
  • United States Navy (USN)
  • United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC)
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps (NOAA Corps)

Shared Leave Questions and Answers

What are some examples of conditions that are not considered "an extraordinary or severe illness or injury"?
Normal and uncomplicated:
  • pregnancy/delivery
  • chicken pox or flu
  • elective cosmetic surgery
  • sprained ankle
Is there a general pool for shared leave donations?
No. Each donation must be directed to a specified recipient
May an eligible employee use shared leave for a reduced schedule or an intermittent leave of absence due to an extraordinary or severe illness or injury?
Yes, so long as the employee otherwise qualifies for shared leave
Is the minimum balance of sick leave hours (176 hours) that leave donors must maintain prorated for part-time employees?
No. All employees, whether part-time or full-time, must maintain a minimum balance of 176 hours of sick leave after their donation.
If I donate sick leave will it be deducted from my Annual Attendance Incentive calculation?
Yes. The donated hours will be treated the same as if you had used the hours yourself. Donated hours are considered sick leave hours used.
If donated hours are returned to an employee can the employee re-donate those hours?
Yes. If personal holiday hours are returned, however, they must either be re-donated or used within the same calendar year in which they were accrued.
If multiple types of leave are donated and all or a portion of the donated hours are returned, how is the return of leave calculated?
Human Resources calculates the unused leave to be returned to donors, prorated by the amounts and types of leaves donated.