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Career Development - Mentee Guide

Is Being Mentored for You?

Benefits of Being Mentored

There are a number of benefits of engaging in a mentoring relationship, but there is a level of responsibility also. It is up to you to determine if the benefits are worth the additional responsibilities.

Download the Mentoring Benefits Checklist now to discover how mentoring can benefit you.

Mentoring is a Unique Opportunity

Mentoring is not training, social chit-chat, or supervision. It is a unique relationship that takes participants out of their day-to-day activities to plan for their future and strategize how they will achieve their goals.

There are several factors which can take a typical relationship and turn it into a mentoring relationship, for example:

Your Past Mentors

Chances are you've had mentors in the past and possibly didn't realize it at the time. This activity invites you to look back on your life to identify past mentors. In addition, the form asks you to give thought to what characteristics each person possessed that helped establish a mentoring relationship, and the behaviors you exhibited that made the mentoring stick.

Download the Past Mentors Activity now.

Helping Your Mentor Help You

There are several ways you can assist your mentor in building a productive relationship.

Finding a Mentor

If you don't have a mentor in mind, there are a number of ways that you can find a potential mentor. Since currently the University of Washington does not provide a mentoring program, we've included some ideas for you to consider in identifying a mentor.

Research

Do some research to identify people who are leaders in their field. Reading UWeek and local newspapers and visiting the UW website are great ways to start learning about potential mentors at the UW.

If you're more interested in finding a mentor outside of the UW, again refer to local newspapers (particularly the business section and northwest life section) and the web.

Network

Networking is an easy and fun way to meet other people in a variety of settings. Simply put, networking is an intentional effort to be at the right place at the right time to meet the right people. Below is a list of places and events where you might have an opportunity to meet the right people.

Ask for Help

In addition to "putting yourself out there," seek the assistance of someone who knows a lot of people or knows the person you wish to have mentor you. Find out from them the best way to connect with potential mentors or even ask them to help with the initial introduction.

Let people know that you are looking for a mentor, and articulate the type of person you are hoping to build a relationship with. You'll be surprised how willing others are to help you get connected with the right people.

Start a Departmental Mentoring Program

You are more than likely not the only person in your unit interested in mentoring. You might want to talk with your supervisor about the possibility of starting a departmental mentoring program.

Next Section of the Mentee Guide

Keys to a Successful Mentor/Mentee Relationship

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