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Making Calendar Entries
Recording Suspended Operations Make Up Time

CONTENTS


Recording Make Up Time

When contract classified, classified non-union, and overtime-eligible professional staff employees (who are not in essential services positions) work extra hours to make up time missed following a suspension of operations, record the extra hours worked as follows:

  1. Show the actual days of suspended operations as a blank day, making a note in the "Notes" section that operations were suspended for the day (or days) and that the employee is choosing to make up the time missed within 90 days. 
  2. On the day(s) when the make-up hours are worked, show the regular work hours, plus the hours being made up. Record the make-up hours either as "OP" (Overtime Worked & Paid 1.5) if the time worked is subject to mandatory overtime pay requirements at time and one half, or as "SP" (Overtime Worked & Paid 1.0) when make-up time is to be counted as straight time. Unless there is additional work that must be performed on an overtime basis, the value of the make-up hours worked should not exceed the amount of time missed during the period of suspended operations.
  3. In the “Notes” section, indicate that the “OP” or “SP” is for time being made up for the suspended operations.

Examples

In reviewing the following examples, keep in mind that any make-up hours worked will be in excess of the employee’s normal work schedule, and that normal overtime calculation requirements apply, based on the employee’s employment category (professional staff, contract classified or classified non-union staff).  The examples are not exhaustive, but illustrate the considerations that you must make when determining how make-up time is credited.

EXAMPLE 1: A full time contract classified, classified non-union, or overtime-eligible professional staff employee who missed 24 hours of work due to suspended operations needs to work 16 make-up hours that qualify as overtime to make up the value of the 24 hours of work missed. (16 hours of overtime x 1.5 = 24)

EXAMPLE 2: (Holiday Considerations) A full time contract classified, classified non-union, or overtime-eligible professional staff employee who missed 24 hours of work due to suspended operations works 8 make-up hours during a week in which a holiday falls.

EXAMPLE 3: (Part time employee): A 50% FTE contract classified, classified non-union, or overtime-eligible professional staff employee who missed 12 hours of work due to suspended operations works 8 make-up hours. The employee would be credited for 8 hours make-up time and would still need to make up an additional 4 hours.

EXAMPLE 4 (chart for make-up time): A 100% FTE overtime-eligible professional staff employee missed 24 hours of work due to suspended operations. During the week of January 5 - 9, the employee works 2 hours that would be credited as overtime. These 2 hours are credited as 3 hours (2 hours x 1.5 rate) toward the 24 hours owed. The employee now needs to make up 21 hours. Two weeks later the employee works two hours that would be credited at straight time due to the holiday earlier in the week. These 2 hours are credited as 2 hours (2 hours x 1.0 rate) towards the remaining 21 hours owed. The employee now needs to make up 19 hours..

Make-up workweek Hours to be made up Hours worked Value of hours worked Remaining Hours to be made up
Week of Jan 5-9 24 2 at OT (1.5) equivalent 3 21
Week of Jan 19-23 21 2 at straight time (1.0) equivalent 2 19

Recording Suspended Operations for Overtime Exempt Professional Staff

On the days operations were suspended, leave the calendar days blank in OWLS and create a note that operations were suspended.

For more information about how suspended operations affects overtime exempt professional staff, please review the suspended operations webpage.

Additional Considerations

Crediting of Overtime

Be sure to consider the employee’s employment type when determining whether the make-up time worked is to be credited at straight time or at the overtime premium.

Leave without Pay

If an employee chooses to be on leave without pay on the employee's last regular work day before a holiday, make sure that the employee understands that he/she is not paid for the holiday.

FAQs

An employee intended to make up the time for suspended operations but ultimately did not. How do I handle this situation and what do I do in OWLS?
  1. If the employee had eligible paid leave available before the date(s) on which the University suspended operations, record the use of leave on the days when operations were suspended. This may require editing a previously submitted month and re-releasing PERMs.
  2. If the employee did not have enough paid leave to cover the time missed, he/she will need to use leave without pay. If this also results in the employee being on leave without pay the day prior to a holiday, the employee will not be entitled to be paid for the holiday and an overpayment will have to be recovered. Follow regular payroll overpayment/repayment processing after correcting the month in OWLS.
Can an employee make up time missed due to inclement weather?
No. The inclement weather policy allows for the use of paid leave or leave without pay to cover an employee's absence. The make-up option applies only to days when operations were suspended.
Can an employee apply leave without pay before paid leave to cover time missed during suspended operations to ensure that the employee is in pay status on the day before a holiday?
Yes. The goal of the University's suspended operations practices are to mitigate, as much as is reasonably possible, the impact on employees. So applying leave as described in the question is permissible.

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